Sunderland students urged to 'scoot safe' as e-scooter operator Neuron teams up with blind charity for freshers week campaign

As students return to Wearside this week, Neuron hopes to educate and remind users about the importance of ‘safe and considerate riding’ in partnership with a blind charity.

Neuron has launched its Student ScootSafe Campaign in partnership with The Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) as students return to Sunderland this week for the start of term, which usually results in an uptick in the use of Neuron’s bright orange e-scooters.

The e-scooter operator says their transport is a great way for students to get around Sunderland, and for freshers to get to know the city in a safe, convenient and sustainable way.

But hope to remind riders to be aware of the riding rules and to use the e-scooters responsibly.

Sunderland's e-scooters.

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As part of the campaign, Neuron’s ScootSafe team will be present at the University of Sunderland Freshers Fair on September 21.

At the event, students will have the opportunity to try riding the e-scooters on a safety training track and will also be able to take part in a safety briefing to earn a discount for their next ride.

RNIB will also be at the event, helping to educate students on the experiences of pedestrians affected by sight loss.

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University of Sunderland-City Campus, CitySpace.

Students will have the opportunity to try on glasses that simulate sight loss which give users a better understanding of how people who are blind and partially sighted experience the world.

Cormac Quinn, UK Regional Manager at Neuron Mobility, said: “We know our e-scooters are popular with students because they provide a safe and environmentally friendly transport option in Sunderland.

"As students return to University, and freshers start using the e-scooters for the first time, we want to ensure that riders use the e-scooters safely and responsibly.”

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A spokesman for RNIB added: “E-scooters are fast-moving and operate quietly, so they pose a particular risk for blind and partially sighted pedestrians. RNIB has been working with the Department for Transport, local councils and Neuron to try to address these concerns.

"We are pleased to continue our work with Neuron to get the message out about safe riding for the benefit of blind and partially sighted people”.