Week of climate protests planned for Sunderland as thousands of schoolchildren take part in walkout

Climate protestors will take part in a a series of demonstrations across Sunderland this week.

Friday, 20th September 2019, 10:27 am
Updated Friday, 20th September 2019, 13:42 pm
Climate protestors in Sheffield. There are three extinction rebellion planned events set to take place in Sunderland this week.

A mass school walk-out, a student ‘die-in’ and a stunning beach artwork are all planned as as part of the drive to highlight the dangers of climate change.

Here’s how you can get involved.

Today, Friday, September 20.

Climate protestors in Sheffield. There are three extinction rebellion planned events set to take place in Sunderland this week.

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Students and schoolchildren will gather at the civic centre at noon as part of a mass nationwide walkout.

Amnesty International’s Secretary General Kumi Naidoo has written to schools in the North East, urging them to allow children to take part, he said: “I believe that the cause for which these children are fighting is of such historic significance that I am writing to you today with a request neither to prevent nor punish your pupils from taking part in the global days of strikes.”

Reverend Chris Howson, associate priest at Sunderland Minster and University of Sunderland chaplain, said: “I am really pleased that for the first time the students at the university are joining with the public for the climate strike.

“Young people around the world are having to realise that they have to look at the way we live or face an awful future.”

Saturday, September 21.

Sunderland university students and climate activists will stage a ‘die-in’ at Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens at noon, lying down on the grass to highlight the impact of climate change.

Thursday, September 26.

Members of protest group Extinction Rebellion Sunderland will be creating a 35metre diameter version of the group’s symbol on Roker beach.

Work will start at low tide at 8am and take about an hour. The artwork will be visible until it is covered by the tide at about 10.30am.

Grandad Allan Rowell is one of the organisers: “I used to work as a white liner, painting the lines on the road,” he said.

“I thought I could use these skills so that a group of us could draw a massive extinction rebellion symbol in the sand.

“We know the tide will wash away our work in just a few hours, but we hope people will see it and want to know more.”