Legal challenge on ‘failure to investigate’ Dominic Cummings reaches High Court

A legal challenge over the decision not to investigate Dominic Cummings for alleged breaches of coronavirus lockdown rules will be heard by the High Court.

In a press conference in the 10 Downing Street garden in May, Mr Cummings argued his journey was justified as he sought to protect his family’s health.

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Boris Johnson’s senior aide also said he subsequently took a “short drive” to Barnard Castle, around 25 miles away from where he was isolating, on his wife’s 45th birthday to test his eyesight after it was affected by Covid-19, to “see if I could drive safely”.

A legal challenge over the decision not to investigate Dominic Cummings for alleged breaches of coronavirus lockdown rules will be heard by the High Court. Photo by PA.

Mr Cummings declined to apologise, saying his actions were “reasonable in these circumstances”, adding: “I don’t regret what I did”.

A snap poll of 1,160 adults by YouGov found 71% of Britons believed Mr Cummings broke the lockdown.

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London resident Martin Redston is taking legal action against the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), Max Hill QC, over the alleged failure to properly consider whether Mr Cummings breached lockdown rules.

His application for permission to bring a full High Court challenge against the DPP will be heard at the Royal Courts of Justice in London this afternoon, Tuesday, November 3, with £45,000 raised through crowdfunding to cover potential legal costs.

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He said: “The rule of law should apply for all persons, irrespective of any friendships in Government.”

He added a number of people in public office had flouted the rules had resigned, but in respect of Mr Cummings, representatives of the Government had voiced their support of him.

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A Crown Prosecution Service spokesman previously said investigations into alleged criminal conduct are a matter for the police and as the application for judicial review will be contested it could not comment further.

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