20mph zones, improvements and changes planned for 200 roads and footpaths in Sunderland

More than 200 road and footpath projects are due to take place in Sunderland after council bosses signed off their 2020/21 programme.

Friday, 27th March 2020, 8:57 pm
Updated Sunday, 29th March 2020, 4:33 pm
A crew at work on a previous project

The schemes include resurfacing, work on bridges and traffic schemes such as 20mph zones.

Sunderland City Council’s ruling cabinet approved the latest works at its meeting on March 24.

Around £5.7million has been scheduled for the projects as part of the council’s 2020/2021 capital budget which was agreed earlier this month.

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The 2020/21 programme covers sections of some of the city’s key routes and includes:

:: A183 Chester Road

:: A690 Durham Road

:: A182 in Copt Hill and Shiney Row

:: Southwick’s A1290 Camden Street gyratory.

:: Resurfacing works on sections of the cross-city Sunderland and Washington highways.

Bridge maintenance works include a second phase of maintenance to the A182 Washington Interchange and work at the A1018 Newcastle Road bridge over the rail and Metro line.

The programme also covers the Pallion New Road and Trimdon Street footbridge in Millfield and the Stockton Road Metro bridge, alongside a second phase of work at the A1231 Nissan Interchange.

Further school 20mph zones are planned and the roll out of the Washington Concord, Biddick and Rickleton 20mph zone is continuing.

Other schemes include a school streets pilot to “address vehicle emissions in front of schools.”

A report for cabinet states the council will “identify a location” for the scheme and “establish appropriate criteria for future assessment.”

Cabinet Member for Environment and Transport, Coun Amy Wilson, said after the meeting: “In drawing up the annual programme, the council has consulted widely with feedback from councillors, residents and businesses and there is a robust and rigorous prioritisation process.

“The council has to look closely at traffic volumes, surface conditions for where there has been wear and tear, road safety, and all the feedback it receives.”

She added: “Many, many parents, residents and schools welcome the greater safety and security that lower speed limits can bring.

“The council regularly receives petitions to lower limits in residential areas and as a listening council that’s what this council does.

“Alongside our commitment to continued maintenance, improvements and investments to our highways network, the council listens and learns about where works are needed.”