Warning to families as giant jellyfish spotted on Sunderland beach

A huge jellyfish washed up on Seaburn beach over the bank holiday weekend, prompting a warning to families across the city to stay safe at the seaside.

Monday, 26th August 2019, 13:06 pm

The creature, suspected to be a lion’s mane jellyfish, was spotted by Deborah Poxton and her family, of Ryhope, at around 9am on Sunday, August 25.

It washed up with the high tide, and was level with the Funky Beach Cafe.

Deborah's son Shawn, 11, took pictures of the jellyfish on the sand, while Deborah, 50, added that their spot should serve as a warning for parents and children taking to the water.

The jellyfish spotted at Seaburn by Deborah Poxton and her family. Picture: Shawn Poxton, age 11.

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A lion’s mane jellyfish has a powerful sting, which can leave affected skin red and blistered.

What should you do if you’re stung by a jellyfish?

According to advice from the NHS, most stings from sea creatures in the UK are not serious and can be treated with first aid.

Sometimes you may need to go to hospital, or ask a lifeguard or someone with first aid training for help.

The jellyfish spotted at Seaburn by Deborah Poxton and her family. Picture: Shawn Poxton, age 11.

Here’s what you should do:

Rinse the affected area with seawater (not fresh water) Remove any spines from the skin using tweezers or the edge of a bank card Soak the area in very warm water (as hot as can be tolerated) for at least 30 minutes – use hot flannels or towels if you cannot soak it Take painkillers like paracetamol or ibuprofen

You should not use vinegar, apply ice or a cold pack, cover the wound or touch any of the spines. And contrary to popular belief, do NOT urinate on the sting.