'Dangerous' Sunderland child sex attacker back behind bars after more victims speak out

A "dangerous" serial child sex attacker is back behind bars after more victims bravely spoke out about their sickening ordeals.

By Karon Kelly
Monday, 15 April, 2019, 14:23
Derek Storey

Derek Storey was jailed for eight years in 2013 for offences against four victims, both male and female, in the 1970s.

The now 57-year-old, who also has a conviction for sexually assaulting a child in 1990, was released in 2017, after serving half of the eight-year term.

But now at Newcastle Crown Court Storey, who a judge said poses a "high risk" to children, has today been sentenced to ten years and nine months imprisonment, with a three year extended licence period, for further shocking offences.

The court heard Storey was questioned by detectives about the new allegations while he was still serving his last sentence, in HMP Northumberland.

He said the fresh allegations were "not true".

But on the day he was due to stand trial over the attacks, he pleaded guilty to 11 sexual assault charges.

Judge Jeremy Freedman said Storey must sign the sex offenders register and abide by a sexual harm prevention order for the rest of his life.

Judge Freedman told him: "Your sexual gratification was all that mattered to you.

"It is apparent you have shown no understanding, no empathy of the harm you have caused.

"I have not seen any remorse.

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"You have no concept of the effect sexual abuse has on those children."

The judge added: "The probation report assesses that you pose a high risk of serious harm to children through sexual offending. I agree.

"In my judgement, you do pose a high risk of serious harm to children through sexual offending and the public needs to be protected from you.

"You are, in short, dangerous."

The court heard Storey had told one of his latest victims that his offending was their "little secret" and warned her not to tell anybody.

Both of the victims, who are now women, say what Storey did to them as children has blighted the rest of their lives.

One of them said in a statement she feels "empty, lost and confused" inside and that being near men in public makes her "stomach turn".

The other said her ordeal is something that will "effect me for the rest of my life" and that she felt like she had done something wrong.

Tony Hawks, defending, said Storey's guilty pleas meant the victims were not put through the distress of giving evidence about their traumatic experiences.

Mr Hawks said: "He made them realise, ultimately, they were to be believed, by his own admission."