Study creates the ultimate playlists for your loved ones with dementia

For those living with dementia, uplifting music can be a powerful way to trigger positive feelings and reconnect with loved ones.

The study reveals the best playlist for people with dementia
The study reveals the best playlist for people with dementia

With 900,000 people in the UK currently living with dementia, experts at Lottie analysed the musical attributes of 600 different songs in order to create a playlist which would be beneficial for anyone experiencing symptoms of dementia.

The scoring of each song was specifically tailored depending on the audio attributes that would be appropriate for those with dementia.

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For example, songs with a higher value for danceability, energy and positivity achieved a higher score, whereas those with a higher loudness value were given a lower score.

Lottie found that the number one song for those aged between 60 - 69 is, ‘Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough’ by Michael Jackson (7.90/10).

Originally released in 1979, its upbeat nature (scoring 9.54/10 for danceability) may remind those living with dementia of happy memories , such as their first kiss, teenage years, family parties and loved ones.

Following closely behind in second position is ‘Blue Monday’ by New Order, achieving an overall score of 7.85/10.

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This electronic track ranks second due to its repetitive nature which has the potential to evoke emotion, and with it memories.

Ranking in third position is ‘Super Freak’ by Rick James (7.58/10).

It has been found that stimulating music can inspire dance and movement for those living with dementia, encouraging physical exercise and excitement.

Among those aged 80 - 89, Lottie found that ‘The Battle Of New Orleans’ by Johnny Horton (8.68/10) is the most appropriate song to ignite memories for those living with dementia

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In second position is another popular country track, ‘Summertime Blues’ by Eddie Cochran (7.99/10). This soothing country music song has the capability to evoke positive memories and boost brain function.

Following closely behind in third is, ‘Johnny B. Goode’ by Chuck Berry (7.61/10). Due to its popularity, this upbeat rock classic may have the potential to trigger pleasurable responses from those living with dementia, such as smiling or dancing.

If you would like to view a definitive playlist which covers all decades in which people typically would have been in their youth, click here