CHILDLINE ADVICE: Helping children speak out by urging them to talk PANTS!

Sad though it is, it appears the summer is almost over - but there’s still time to share an important NSPCC message with your young ones before they return to school.

Monday, 30th August 2021, 12:00 am
Our Talk PANTS campaign helps parents to explain to children how they can speak out about anything that makes them uncomfortable, and gives them the confidence to do that.

Each year, we visit hundreds of primary schools across the North-East and across the country to support parents and share important information with children.

Our Talk PANTS campaign helps parents to explain to children how they can speak out about anything that makes them uncomfortable, and gives them the confidence to do that.

Through fun and educational activities, PANTS helps parents to explain to children that Privates are private, to Always remember their body belongs to them, No means no, they should Talk about secrets that upset them, and Speak up, because someone can help.

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We’ve been talking PANTS since 2013, to ensure children are given this vital information, which is shared using age-appropriate language and a catchy music video by our dinosaur mascot, Pantosaurus.

The video is available on our YouTube page and online at www.nspcc.org.uk As well as being fun, it has a serious message to give children essential information and confidence.

Since Talk PANTS was launched, the video has been viewed more than 2.3 million times, sparking more than 1.5m conversations. We developed new ways to share this information during the pandemic too, to help children and parents explore the campaign while schools were closed, and over the summer break.

Of course, we understand some parents might find the idea of talking to their children about this topic challenging, but the campaign is delivered in simple language which is suitable for younger children.

We encourage parents to help keep their children safe by sharing the message in every day life, helping young people learn how to identify when something is wrong, and how they can speak out about it.

There’s lots of information available to parents at www.nspcc.org.uk, and if children want to find out more, they can visit www.childline.org.uk or search online for ‘NSPCC PANTS’.

And of course, if they’re worried about speaking out about anything they’re concerned about, our Childline counsellors are available around the clock on 0800 1111, with chatboards and more advice on the Childline website too.