Fake £2 Disney+ offer - fraudsters targeting viewers offering 99% discount on streaming subscriptions

Fraudsters are sending what looks like Disney+ branding on emails, claiming a possible 98% discount on subscriptions to the streaming service.

Consumer magazine Which? says the email claims to offer a Disney+ TV package at only £2 a year for just £2. A genuine Disney+ subscription is £79.90 a year.

The email is sent from “[email protected]” and includes an image from The Avengers film. Clicking on a link supposedly activates a trial of the service.

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Anyone clicking on these websites is asked to create an account by entering an email address and password, as well as personal details.

Fraudsters are sending what looks like Disney+ branding on emails, claiming a possible 98% discount on subscriptions.
Fraudsters are sending what looks like Disney+ branding on emails, claiming a possible 98% discount on subscriptions.
Fraudsters are sending what looks like Disney+ branding on emails, claiming a possible 98% discount on subscriptions.

A countdown clock tells users that the “offer” ends soon, to encourage people to act quickly before they have second thoughts. The scammers then have the victim’s details.

All the URLs are linked to a Belgian digital gaming company called Skill Games ApS. Which? contacted the company but did not receive a response.

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Online reviewers accuse the websites of “taking unauthorised payments from accounts and making users pay shipping fees for items they’d won in games, which then never turned up”.

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The magazine said: “If you receive a scam email, you’d hope it would go straight into your spam folder – but unfortunately, that isn’t always the case. This latest dodgy email targets recipients with a '98% discount' on subscriptions to the Disney+ streaming service.

“It's an example of an impersonation scam. We’ve recently reported on other scam emails promoting diet pills using fake Dragons’ Den endorsements and fraudsters imitating Hotmail to phish for personal details.”