Clergyman is called up to become Queen's chaplain

Reverend Canon David Glover has been honoured by being appointed as a Chaplain to the Queen (QHC).
Reverend Canon David Glover has been honoured by being appointed as a Chaplain to the Queen (QHC).

A reverend has been appointed as the Chaplain to the Queen.

The Rev Canon David Glover, who is Rector of Holy Trinity Washington in the Diocese of Durham, said he was shocked but honoured to learn that he had been appointed.

Reverend Canon David Glover gives a service.

Reverend Canon David Glover gives a service.

He added: “It came as a complete surprise, and although it is mainly an honorary title, I will be expected to preach once a year at the Chapel Royal in St James’ as well as attending the

garden party, other than that I believe the duties are quite light.”

The Right Reverend Paul Butler, Bishop of Durham, said he was "delighted" by the appointment.

"This is excellent news for David and for the whole community of Holy Trinity in Washington, where he continues to serve, as well as the Diocese of Durham," he said.

"David is a highly respected and distinguished parish priest and area dean of Chester-le-Street whose abilities have been rightly recognised."

The honour can be given to members of any faith who have had a long and distinguished service.

Rev Canon David Glover becomes Chaplain to Her Majesty in succession to the Rev Canon John Byrne.

An Honorary Chaplain to the Queen is a member of the clergy within the United Kingdom who, through long and distinguished service, is appointed to minister to the monarch of the United

Kingdom.

Honorary Chaplains wear a scarlet cassock and a special bronze badge consisting of the royal cypher and crown within an oval wreath.

The badge is worn below medal ribbons or miniature medals during the conduct of religious services on the left side of the scarf by chaplains who wear the scarf and on academic or

ordinary clerical dress by other chaplains.