Sunderland Literature Festival: Tardis and Cinderella carriage help bring books alive

Children from Year 2 at Richard Avenue Primary School are joined by Sunderland City Councillor Peter Gibson and Richard Wright, Sunderland Skills Centre Manager at Learning Curve at Sunderland Library where a replica Tardis commissioned by Sunderland City Council 's West Area Comittee and Created by Pallion based 'Learning Curve' training providers is now on display as part of Sunderland Literature Festival.
Children from Year 2 at Richard Avenue Primary School are joined by Sunderland City Councillor Peter Gibson and Richard Wright, Sunderland Skills Centre Manager at Learning Curve at Sunderland Library where a replica Tardis commissioned by Sunderland City Council 's West Area Comittee and Created by Pallion based 'Learning Curve' training providers is now on display as part of Sunderland Literature Festival.
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Pint-sized princesses and tiny Tardis fans were in for a treat as part of a city-wide festival.

Youngsters from Richard Avenue Primary School were the first to check out a replica Tardis and fairytale princess Cinderella carriage which are in place at the City Library and Arts Centre, in Fawcett Street, throughout October as part of the Sunderland Literature Festival.

Children from Year 2 at Richard Avenue Primary School are joined by Sunderland City Councillor Peter Gibson at Sunderland Library where a fairytale princess Cinderella style carriage is now on display as part of Sunderland Literature Festival.

Children from Year 2 at Richard Avenue Primary School are joined by Sunderland City Councillor Peter Gibson at Sunderland Library where a fairytale princess Cinderella style carriage is now on display as part of Sunderland Literature Festival.

It’s hoped the attractions will help to spark an interest in the books available at the library, as well as the many events taking place as part of the festival.

Visitors are being encouraged to take selfies with the unusual forms of fantasy transport.

The Tardis was commissioned by Sunderland City Council’s West Area Committee and created by Pallion based Learning Curve training providers, as part of the West Area Heritage Festival held in Barnes Park earlier this year.

The fairytale carriage was previously on display at Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books in Newcastle.

Children from Year 2 at Richard Avenue Primary School are joined by Sunderland City Councillor Peter Gibson at Sunderland Library where a fairytale princess Cinderella style carriage is now on display as part of Sunderland Literature Festival.

Children from Year 2 at Richard Avenue Primary School are joined by Sunderland City Councillor Peter Gibson at Sunderland Library where a fairytale princess Cinderella style carriage is now on display as part of Sunderland Literature Festival.

Senior Sunderland city councillor responsible for culture, John Kelly, said: “We hope these temporary exhibits at the City Library will not only encourage more visitors, but also inspire people to find out more about the literature and books which helped create them.”

The Tardis is based on the police box first designed and built in Sunderland, which stood near Kayll Road and is believed to have been the inspiration for Doctor Who’s iconic time travelling machine.

Councillor Peter Gibson, chairman on the West Are Committee, said: “I’m delighted that the replica of the Tardis local young people working with Learning Curve built, inspired by a police box first designed in Sunderland, will play such an important part in the Sunderland Literature Festival. It provided the entrance to the West Area Heritage Festival, where people walking through it were taken back in time to visit the various displays and activities celebrating our cultural past.”

Venues across the city are hosting events to celebrate literature, poetry and words in all their forms, for the Sunderland Literature Festival.

Highlights this week include a Kate Poetry Workshop at Washington Town Centre Library, a performance by People’s Republic of Poetry at Arts Centre Washington and a discussion with Mark Blacklock about his novel I’m Jack, based on Wearside Jack, at Holy Trinity Church in the East End.