Sunderland dad hopes to knock out diabetes with charity white-collar boxing performance

Lee Jeffries, left, is to box for charity after daughter Kaidyn Jeffries, front, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Also pictured are boxers Sarah Conway and Jamie Freeman, who will also take part.
Lee Jeffries, left, is to box for charity after daughter Kaidyn Jeffries, front, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Also pictured are boxers Sarah Conway and Jamie Freeman, who will also take part.
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A dad is hoping to help deliver a knockout blow to diabetes when he takes part in a charity boxing event later this year.

Lee Jeffries, from Millfield, is to take part in a white collar boxing event at Passion Nightclub, in Holmeside, Sunderland, on November 28.

Kaidyn Jeffries in the ring with dad Lee and boxers Sarah Conway and Jamie Freeman, who will all take part in a charity fight night.

Kaidyn Jeffries in the ring with dad Lee and boxers Sarah Conway and Jamie Freeman, who will all take part in a charity fight night.

The single dad, 46, was given a huge shock last October when daughter Kaidyn, five, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes.

Kaidyn, who goes to Diamond Hall Academy, in Well Street, Sunderland, now has to have five injections a day, while she visits The Niall Quinn Children’s Centre, at Sunderland Royal Hospital, once a week to get her bloods checked.

Dad Lee is now hoping to raise funds by taking part in the boxing match for the charity Type 1 Kidz, which is a group that supports young people living with Type 1 diabetes in the North East.

He said: “I’m taking part because my daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes last October.

It was a big shock when Kaidyn was diagnosed, but the treatment she has had has been so good

Lee Jeffries

“She has to have her bloods checked once a week, and the nurses have been brilliant. It was a big shock when she was first diagnosed, but the treatment she has had has been so good.

“Now I want to raise some money for Type 1 Kidz, which helps those living with diabetes. I’m hoping to raise between £200 and £300 for the charity.”

Lee will be among a host of people taking place in the white collar boxing event, with all participants raising money for their chosen charity.

White collar boxing originated in Gleason’s Gym, in New York, in 1988, with all those who take part wearing protective head gear and gloves, while a paramedic and doctor are on hand in an attempt to ensure safety.

It will be Lee’s first foray into that form of the sport, having boxed at amateur level as a youngster 30 years ago.

He added: “I boxed 30 years ago and I’m just coaching now, but I got the chance to do this and thought it was the least I could do.

“It’s the first time I’ve boxed white collar, so I’m a bit unsure on what it entails myself. I do know that it isn’t as severe as normal boxing, as you wear headguards and the rounds are shorter.

“I’m really looking forward to getting back in the ring.”

There are still spaces for six more people to sign up for the event, which will include 12 weeks of training. Those interested can call 07708 969177.