Storm Ophelia hits the North East – but how long will it last?

A man take selfies in waves and high wind at Lahinch in County Clare on the West Coast of Ireland yesterday. Picture by Niall Carson/PA Wire.
A man take selfies in waves and high wind at Lahinch in County Clare on the West Coast of Ireland yesterday. Picture by Niall Carson/PA Wire.
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The North East is continuing to take a battering from Storm Ophelia.

A yellow warning of wind remains in place in the region, with the stormy weather expected to continue until at least 3pm.

The Met Office says gusts could reach as high as 70mph over the far south east of Scotland and parts of north east England.

Yesterday, the skies above much of the North East turned dark, with the Met Office saying it is thought that for former hurrican drew Saharan dust north to the UK and made the sun appear redder than usual, before turning the skies a dark yellow.

Commuters have been warned of the potential for poor road conditions, while the weather could also hit rail services.

The storm has moved to the UK after Ireland experienced the worst of the weather yesterday, with winds of almost 100mph damaging electricity networks and causing widespread disruption.

One man was killed in Ravensdale, Dundalk, when a car he was in was struck by a tree at around 2.45pm, gardai said.

He has been named in reports as Fintan Goss, 33, who was a father-of-two, according to the Irish Independent.

In Cahir, Co Tipperary, a 31-year-old was killed in a chainsaw accident when he was trying to clear a tree downed by the wind.

He has been named locally as Michael Pyke.

Earlier, a woman driver in her 50s died when a tree fell on her car in strong winds near Aglish village in Co Waterford.

The Irish Independent reported the victim was former oncology nurse Clare O’Neill, who was due to celebrate her 59th birthday on Tuesday.

The Met Office has reduced the area covered by a yellow weather warning, but has still said a spell of “very windy weather is likely”.

Their forecast added: “Some damage to buildings, such as tiles blown from roofs, could happen.”

Forecaster Steven Keates said commuters should expect “very gusty conditions”, with winds of up to 70mph.

He said: “The strong winds will continue but should moderate a little bit compared to what we have seen.

“There’s still a risk of gales and it’s still strong enough to cause disruption, but a little bit down on what we have seen.”