Storm Emma blows in to whip up snow left by 'beast from the east'

The bad weather is set to continue.
The bad weather is set to continue.

The severe weather is set to continue as forecasters predict that another weather system, Storm Emma, will bring blizzards, gales and sleet to the UK.

From Thursday, forecasters predict that the latest storm will see the severe weather continue as it meets the chilly 'beast from the east'.

The Met Office has said that much of the North East should expect heavy snow showers through much of Thursday, with it remaining very cold again due to strong easterly winds giving a significant wind chill. The maximum temperature is -1C.

The outlook for Friday to Sunday looks set to remain cold with widespread frosts from Friday and through the weekend.

There will be scattered snow showers at times, along with easterly winds.

The snow could turn more persistent at times on Saturday.

As the bad weather continues, drivers are being urged to remain vigilant and be prepared before setting out on journeys after Highways England issued a further severe weather alert covering large parts of the country and lasting until Friday morning.

Highways England issued its latest amber ‘be prepared’ alert - covering the East, South East, South West and Midlands on Wednesday.

The current amber alert for the North East is expected to be lifted by noon on Thursday but light snow showers are set to persist into Friday.

Highways England’s salt spreading and ploughing teams will continue to work around the clock to treat roads and keep traffic moving.

Highways England’s Head of Road Safety, Richard Leonard, said: “Our gritting teams have been out treating the roads throughout the day and will continue to spreading salt 24 hours a day to keep the roads moving.

“Drivers should plan their journeys, monitor weather reports and pack a snow kit of blankets, food, water and a shovel if they really need to travel. You should avoid driving during heavy snow if at all possible.

“Our advice is to keep your distance and reduce your speed because, even in conditions that seem normal and when the snow is not settling, it can be slippery if ice patches have formed, or where fresh salt has not been worked into the carriageway.”