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Homes hope as final days of old school site are numbered

Seaham School of Technology
Seaham School of Technology
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A former school site is to be knocked down within months and could make way for a new housing estate.

Demolition works have been approved for the Seaham School of Technology site in Burnhall Way, Seaham, after the buildings were left empty when classes moved to a new £14million complex off Station Road.

Following the successful opening of the new Seaham High School we are due to start the demolition of the former Seaham School of Technology early next year as part of our ongoing regeneration of the area.

Councillor Neil Foster

Seaham High School opened in September following on from years of negotiations with the Government to secure a new building and the six hectare site where Seaham Colliery once stood.

It had been earmarked for a housing estate as part of a masterplan for the town, but a deal with the Homes and Communities Agency led to it being dedicated as a school instead.

The Northlea base, which had been open for more than 50 years, was hit by a series of structural issues, with 11 classrooms lost in the last two years after they were deemed unsafe.

They were cordoned off and 60 tonnes of steel, plus netting, was drafted in after the walls began to buckle.

The running costs to maintain the site were also high.

Now Durham County Council is making plans to knock down the crumbling buildings.

Residents living near to the site have been sent letters by its regeneration and economic development department setting out how remote demolition works are to be carried out at the property.

The work is expected to begin in January and it is likely the site could be used to build new homes.

Councillor Neil Foster, cabinet member for economic regeneration, said: “Following the successful opening of the new Seaham High School we are due to start the demolition of the former Seaham School of Technology early next year as part of our ongoing regeneration of the area.

“The location of the new school was made possible by an agreement between the council and the Homes and Communities Agency – owners of the former colliery site on Station Road – which saw several separate pieces of land brought together as one site.

“Once the demolition has been completed, we will clear the site so it can be brought forward by the partnership as a potential development site for housing.”