'If people desperately want it, they will buy it' - what you said about minimum pricing for alcohol

We asked you what you thought about a minimum price per alcohol unit.
We asked you what you thought about a minimum price per alcohol unit.

We asked if you thought introducing a minimum price for a unit of alcohol would help combat excessive drinking.

And in an online poll, 66% of you told us you didn't think such a price should be introduced. Ministers in Wales yesterday decided to take a Public Health (Minimum Price for Alcohol) Bill to the next stage. A minimum unit price is also expected to be introduced in Scotland later this year, after a similar bill passed in 2012.

Last year, it was suggested that such a scheme should be rolled out nationwide if it sees success in Scotland.

Read more: Do you think a minimum unit price for alcohol be introduced in England?

Health chiefs in England have long-campaigned for a minimum price to be introduced across the country. Here's what you had to say on social media.

Benjamin Taylor: "Why should I pay more to enjoy a few cans at the end of a day's graft, simply because utter morons can't drink responsibly?"

Elizabeth Cain: "Will make no difference whatsoever. If people desperately want it they will buy it, even if they can’t afford it, then end up in an even worse predicament because of debt."

Margaret Crosby: "I think this is designed to discourage teenage drinking in particular. The question is, where do young people get their alcohol? From cheap shops, or from the family home?"

Robert Middleton: "We are already taxed to the hilt and this government wants us to pay more, where does it stop. A few of us like a drink now and then. Why should we be penalised for the sake of others."

Zoe Lee: "Why not try educating people. Replace an outdated curriculum with things that actually matter in life."

Joanne Duggan: "It's like cigarettes, no matter how much they are people will still buy it!"

Michael Staines: "Yes, I'm a recovering alcoholic, I would love to see the prices be higher."

Tony Hurst: "If people want to abuse alcohol and cause themselves health problems, charge them for medical help ... why should I be punished for being sensible?"

Andy Âû Wright: "Of course there should be, but only if the tax revenue raised is directed to the NHS services that deal with the results of heavy drinking."

Paul Coverley: "Hit the many for the actions of a few."

Jeanette Fletcher: "I don't drink in the house hardly ever, so why should I have to pay more if I fancy one, because some people want to drink themselves to death.

"If you are an alcoholic they will get drink anyway they can, putting the price up won't stop them."