Family of mauled schoolboy welcome dangerous dog crackdown

Karl Morson, aged 5, in Sunderland Royal Hospital, after being attacked near his Sulgrave, Washington, home by a Rottweiler dog.
Karl Morson, aged 5, in Sunderland Royal Hospital, after being attacked near his Sulgrave, Washington, home by a Rottweiler dog.
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RELATIVES of a schoolboy mauled by a vicious pet have welcomed moves to crackdown on dangerous dog attacks.

Karl Morson, five, is scarred for life after the Rottweiler attack, which took place as he was playing just yards from his Sulgrave home last August.

FEARS ... Sarah Wilkinson, manager of Cleadon Kennels, with Dino, a Lurcher puppy.

FEARS ... Sarah Wilkinson, manager of Cleadon Kennels, with Dino, a Lurcher puppy.

The Usworth Grange Primary School pupil was rushed to Sunderland Royal Hospital where he underwent surgery to stitch together his face.

The owner of the dog is believed to have later had it put down.

Today, Karl’s granddad Dave, 70, welcomed a call by the Government to toughen up laws against owners of dangerous dogs but said more steps needed to be taken.

The measures include closing a loophole in the law so dog owners will face prosecution if their pet attacks someone lawfully on their property.

FEARS ... Sarah Wilkinson, manager of Cleadon Kennels, with Dino, a Lurcher puppy.

FEARS ... Sarah Wilkinson, manager of Cleadon Kennels, with Dino, a Lurcher puppy.

Plans for compulsory microchipping of all puppies by breeders before they are sold have also been unveiled.

Dave said: “I’m all for the things like this, anything is a move in the right direction and if it means less dog attacks then that’s a step in the right direction.”

But Dave said he would like to see the Government introduce stiffer measures, including forcing dogs deemed as dangerous to wear muzzles and awarding compensation to victims of attacks.

“I don’t think dangerous dogs should be allowed at all but as the very least they should be kept muzzled at all times,” he said.

“Compensation should also be paid out to victims. Karl is scarred for life now, he’s too scared to play outside and, understandably, he‘s frightened of dogs.

“That’s not a very nice thing to live with and because the dog owner didn’t have pet insurance, Karl’s not entitled to any compensation.

“If he had been attacked by a person, he would have got thousands of pounds and that’s not right.”

Sarah Wilkinson, of Cleadon Kennels, said the move to microchip puppies will play an essential role in tracking owners of abused and lost animals.

“All responsible dog owners should already have their dogs chipped but if they haven’t it’s really simple and quick to have done,” she said.

“Not long ago we had a Staffy bull terrier that had been stolen from Leeds eight months before.

“Because he had been microchipped, the owner was able to trace him and come and pick him up to take him home.”

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