Young Sunderland scientists crack chemistry conundrum

(L-R) Daniel Halliday, Amy Fleetham (Chemistry Technician), Jessica Watson and Ekaterina Kaliteevskaya.
(L-R) Daniel Halliday, Amy Fleetham (Chemistry Technician), Jessica Watson and Ekaterina Kaliteevskaya.
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STUDENTS were brewing up success as they solved a chemistry conundrum set by academics.

The annual event at the University of Sunderland, designed to test young scientific experts, is now in its 25th year.

The Schools’ Analyst Competition sees sixth-form teams from across the North East turn scientific investigators for the day.

As well as being a fun challenge, the day offered the students a chance to experience the facilities of the university’s £8.5million Sciences Complex.

The teams of A/AS level students are given access to the complex’s laboratories and analytical equipment to perform their experiments.

This year they were challenged by science experts to use their knowledge of chemistry to test the water quality of a newly-discovered spring – and discover if it was suitable to launch a microbrewery.

University senior lecturer Roger Reeve, who has been organising the annual event for the last 25 years, said: “We are always delighted to host this regional event and the competition is always great fun and a wonderful way to inspire young people to get involved in science. The facilities are of the highest quality and hopefully they will inspire the students that a university education is a great option in achieving their ambitions for a career in science.”

This year’s winning team was Framwellgate School Durham, with Durham Johnson School coming in second place.