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What Sunderland students learned at a Jeremy Kyle workshop

The DNA test? Someone heading off to rehab? Getting an intervention from therapist Graham?

Your favourite bits of ITV's Jeremy Kyle show have been dissected by students at Sunderland University as part of a special workshop.

Media, journalism, photography and film students got the chance to construct their own episode during the event, which was held at the University’s media centre.

A series of employer-led workshops are being hosted by the University in a bid to improve students' employment opportunities. This Jeremy Kyle special invited the students to think about what would make an ideal episode of the programme - one of ITV's longest-running daytime offerings.

John Millership, series producer of the Jeremy Kyle Show, said: “This was about breaking down the mechanics and showing the students what really goes into making an episode of Jeremy Kyle.

“The workshop encouraged the students to look into the ingredients needed to make a good programme, to think about the different things which make viewers connect with the show.”

University of Sunderland media students at Jeremy Kyle Show workshop

University of Sunderland media students at Jeremy Kyle Show workshop

Students were asked to consider if they would include DNA results in their constructed shows, revealing text messages or video footage, as well as creating an "emotional arc" for the programme.

Ryan Prentice, 21, a second year broadcast journalism student, took part in the workshop.

He said: “This has really given up the opportunity to see how much work goes into making just one programme in the series.

“It’s been eye-opening to take part in this and get a taste of what we could look forward to in a future career.”

Jeremy Kyle Show series producer John Millership (centre) with students Alicia Todd and Ryan Prentice

Jeremy Kyle Show series producer John Millership (centre) with students Alicia Todd and Ryan Prentice

Jeremy Kyle himself was involved in the event too, sending a personal video message to the students - complete with his go at a North East accent.

The workshop was part of a working relationship between the University of Sunderland and ITV which aims to help media students make the most of career opportunities in their chosen fields.

ITV’s Entertainment North division, which also produces programmes like Countdown and You’ve been Framed, is actively working with universities across the North to help boost student employability.

Lee Hall, Head of School of Media and Communications at the University of Sunderland, said: “The Jeremy Kyle show team were in Sunderland to spot talent and give our students behind-the-scenes insight into how one of television’s most contentious and compelling programmes is put together. It has been absolutely fascinating, and it was great to hear one of the production team is a Sunderland graduate.

“The message from the team to our students is simple: have fun, work hard and aim high. And we couldn’t agree with that more."