Can you help shed light on these nostalgic Echo readers photographs?

John Henry would love to know more about this photograph from St John Boste School in 1979.
John Henry would love to know more about this photograph from St John Boste School in 1979.

Interaction with our readers is always welcomed.

And today, we’re sharing some of the correspondence we have had from Sunderland Echo followers in the hope it triggers even more of a response.

Can you help Elaine Travis with more details on this picture.

Can you help Elaine Travis with more details on this picture.

We had emails from a number of followers, each hoping we could identify people in photographs.

First, John Henry shared his photograph from St John Boste School.

This picture was taken at the school, in Oxclose, Washington, in 1979, and we would love to know if anyone can recognise any of the people in the shot.

If so, get in touch and tell us more.

When we had beaten Arsenal, to a man and woman, we refused politely to leave the ground until the Messiah came out to acknowledge the crowd chanting ‘we want Bob’.

Ian Welford

What are your memories of the school? Can you remember which teachers you had and which were your favourite lessons?

Who were your friends and have you kept in touch?

Secondly, Elaine Travis is hoping readers can recognise some of the people in her black and white shot.

She is not sure of the exact date but believes it could be 1970 or 1971.

An old photo of the Laws family.

An old photo of the Laws family.

It shows Chester Road Junior School’s annual swimming gala and, in particular, seven youngsters having fun.

Elaine told us that her name at the time was Elaine McBride. Can anyone identify the people in the photograph? And what are your memories of Chester Road Junior School and its annual swimming gala?

Did you love a trip to the pool or was swimming your pet hate in your younger days? We would love to know more.

Thirdly, Doreen Kupchick contacted us with her memories of the store called Kennedy’s, which was in the centre of Sunderland.

Back in the day, she was Doreen Laws and loved our trip down Memory Lane.

Nowadays, Doreen lives in Delaware in the USA and was happy to take a journey back to the days when she was a Sunderland resident and certainly had an active life.

She said: I worked the lift at Kennedy’s and then the glove department about 1947. Then worked at Mayfair the chocolate factory.”

As if that was not interesting enough, things got more fascinating still for Doreen. She explained: “I went in to showbusiness and played at the Empire with the famous Zio Angels.

“I worked in the Frankie Franks show and with Old Mother Riley,now living in Delaware USA.”

Doreen added: “It was great seeing the old shopping stores. My grandparents lived on Gill Bridge Avenue opposite Vaux Brewery.”

She had plenty of memories of Sunderland, even going back to the days of the Second World War.

“During the war there was a bomb site on High Street down from Kennedy’s, where merchants sold lots of things and sometimes you could get nylons. My brother worked at Turkeys, from apprentice to retirement.

“There was a sandwich shop near the Palace. If you did not have enough money for the meat, they would dip it in the dripping. I think it was Marsh’s fish and chips on Crowtree Road. Delicious.”

Who remembers Kennedy’s and can you tell us more about it?

Fourthly, our thanks also go to Ian Welford, who spotted our recent tale of Sunderland managers and the different ways they celebrated success – from Bob Stokoe to Paolo Di Canio.

Ian took us further back in time and said: “The first one I remember as a kid was when Willie McPheat scored against Tottenham Hotspur at the Roker End.

“In those days, because it was a full house plus, we sat on the touchline or anywhere you could get to without being on the pitch.

“Of course being Sunderland, when the ball crashed in to the net we did something that had never been done before ... we celebrated by running on the pitch and the sheer joy in everyone’s face will be a memory I will never forget. There was no trouble and we simply returned to our positions.”

Ian also remembers the 1973 FA Cup semi-final “when we had beaten Arsenal. To a man and woman, we refused politely to leave the ground until the Messiah came out to acknowledge the crowd chanting ‘we want Bob’.

“Many of us thought that this is what we will treasure as the finest moment of 1973.

“Little did we know what was in store for us at the final.”

Thank you to everyone for sharing wonderful memories.

If you can shed any light on the photographs, email chris.cordner@jpress.co.uk