LEEDS FESTIVAL: Day Two review: Party time with Mumford & Sons, and the nostalgic return of Limp Bizkit

Mumford & Sons were preaching to the converted as they headlined the main stage on Saturday night at Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.
Mumford & Sons were preaching to the converted as they headlined the main stage on Saturday night at Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.
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Mumford and Sons headlined a busy Saturday at Leeds Festival 2015, proving victorious on a slightly more subdued second day.

Despite expectations of a mixed reaction, the crowd lapped up their intense 17-song set, with one over-excited fan even managing to rip open frontman Marcus

Theatrical rockers The Struts put on one of the standout performances of day two at Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

Theatrical rockers The Struts put on one of the standout performances of day two at Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

Mumford’s shirt.

Hundreds of festival-goers also witnessed the variety of Alt-J and Panic! At The Disco, although the most lively performances were hosted on other stages.

Saturday opened in good conditions – the weather again remained dry – with Mariachi El Bronx first up in the main arena.

But many fans flocked to the NME/BBC Radio 1 tent to witness theatrical rockers The Struts, with hundreds packing in early doors to see one of the standout performances of the festival.

Peace performing on day two of the Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

Peace performing on day two of the Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

The main stage quickly drew crowds thanks to sets from Welsh rockers Neck Deep and the brooding yet excellent duo Drenge.

And those that did stay elsewhere were able to see emo originators American Football, plus talented up-and-comers including Joywave, Sunset Sons and Echosmith.

But while such bands put in good showings, the first to truly excite in large numbers was Panic! At The Disco.

Starting somewhat slowly with less energy than expected, they drew from both their early, pop-punkier material, and their more recent offerings, the former receiving the strongest reaction.

Welsh rockers Neck Deep  drew a sizeable crowd to the main stage at Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

Welsh rockers Neck Deep drew a sizeable crowd to the main stage at Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

They also found time for a number of covers, most notably of Bohemian Rhapsody, which they recreated faithfully while never really touching upon the brilliance of Queen.

As evening approached, it was time to look forward to the headliners, and for better or worse there was a distinctly melancholy feel compared to the first day.

Bastille were up first, and put on a good show, before the far more reserved sounds of Alt-J.

While critically revered, placing their set so late in the day seemed like a bad decision, and despite their iconic light show they struggled to appease such concerns.

Piff the Magic Dragon was a magician who performed in the alternative tent. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

Piff the Magic Dragon was a magician who performed in the alternative tent. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

The crowds did remain and even swell during their set, but other bands would surely have been a more appropriate choice for such a slot.

Fans of rock and something slightly heavier were, at least, well-catered for elsewhere, as Peace and Modern Life Is War played on supporting stages.

Don Broco also made an appearance, fresh from recently headlining Make A Scene Festival in Middlesbrough.

Following Alt-J’s set, the crowds grew further for Mumford & Sons, whose set had been the talk of the festival all day.

On one hand, many looked forward to seeing hits such as I Will Wait and Little Lion Man in the flesh.

But on the other, many had no interest, and instead flocked to see nu-metal legends Limp Bizkit make a hotly-anticipated - and nostalgic - return to the event.

Bastille put on a good show on day two of Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

Bastille put on a good show on day two of Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

There were also fears of a distinctly lukewarm reaction, and press coverage of their Reading performance had been quick to point out the response on social media.

Such fears were unfounded, as from their first track, Snake Eyes, it became apparent that the assembled audience was made up solely of fans.

Marcus Mumford declared it a “party”, and despite playing some of their best-known material at an early stage, the crowds gave the indisputable thumbs-up to their lengthy show.

Guitar solos, banjos and double basses all featured, and the band returned for a two-song encore. There was even time for events usually reserved for rockier bands, as an audience embrace led to a fan ripping Marcus’ shirt.

The evening continued elsewhere for some, with New Found Glory playing to an overflowing crowd at the Lock Up stage, and Knife Party appearing for a closing

electronic set at the NME/BBC Radio 1 stage.

Both performances capped off a day which, while quieter than Friday in parts, overall kept the spirit of the festival alive.

And the most-anticipated would still be to come, with Metallica set to headline a heavier Sunday schedule.

• To see more of Katy Blackwood’s pictures and reviews, VISIT HER WEBSITE HERE.

Alt-J were another highlight of day two at Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.

Alt-J were another highlight of day two at Leeds Festival. Pic: Katy Blackwood.