British Museum beams Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum exhibition live to Sunderland cinema

Curator Paul Roberts rehearsing in the exhibition for 'Pompeii Live at the British Museum' to be shown UK cinemas on 18 June. � The Trustees of the British Museum

Curator Paul Roberts rehearsing in the exhibition for 'Pompeii Live at the British Museum' to be shown UK cinemas on 18 June. � The Trustees of the British Museum

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HISTORY will rise from the ashes when the first live broadcast of Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum is screened at the Sunderland Empire.

The unique airing by the British Museum, on June 18, will see historical experts show audiences famous casts of people caught in the volcanic heat, objects from their daily lives, including jewellery and food, and live performances of eye-witness accounts, and music.

Wall painting of the baker Terentius Neo and his wife. From the House of Terentius Neo, Pompeii. AD 50'79. � Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompeii

Wall painting of the baker Terentius Neo and his wife. From the House of Terentius Neo, Pompeii. AD 50'79. � Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompeii

Also on display will be wooden furniture which was carbonized by the high temperatures of the ash that engulfed Herculaneum – which would not have survived at Pompeii – such as a baby’s crib and a garden bench.

Viewers will be taken along an old Roman street, into a house with bedroom, kitchen and garden, and into the lives of the people who lived there nearly 2,000 years ago.

The broadcast aims to offer audiences a private view of the first major exhibition in London for almost 40 years, entitled Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum.

Museum bosses say it will be some people’s only chance to see the display, and is set to be a ground-breaking event.

British Museum director Neil McGregor said there will be contributions from Cambridge University professor Mary Beard, gardener Rachel de Thame and chef Giorgio Locatelli.

“This is a unique experience for audiences across the country to enjoy a very special evening view of this unmissable exhibition,” he added.

“It is full of fascinating objects lent to us from Italy, which people can enjoy from the comfort of a chair.

“It will be a very personal tour, guided by experts who will explore the stories these special objects, which tell us of Roman life 2,000 thousand years ago.

“We hope this will inspire people to travel to come and see the exhibition at the British Museum.”

The broadcast will be screened at the Sunderland Empire on June 18, at 7pm.

A special broadcast will also be given the next day for city key stage two pupils at 11am.