Sunderland folk tell their stories through glass

TRUE COLOURS: Rosalind Copeland, glass student Sarah Heseltine and Marjorie Karrison who helped make a video of their experiences with glass.
TRUE COLOURS: Rosalind Copeland, glass student Sarah Heseltine and Marjorie Karrison who helped make a video of their experiences with glass.
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WEARSIDERS young and old have been going digital for a modern take on storytelling.

Fifteen participants aged 15 to 84 have created their own audio-visuals to tell a personal story and all have gone on display at National Glass Centre.

Digital Storytelling display at the National Glass Centre - Gerald Gustard, who was filmed talking about his experiences working in the glass industry iin Sunderland looking at an enlarged cutting from the Sunderland Echo which shows Gerald  (2nd left) receving engineering apprentice of the year award at James A Jobling glassworks in 1962

Digital Storytelling display at the National Glass Centre - Gerald Gustard, who was filmed talking about his experiences working in the glass industry iin Sunderland looking at an enlarged cutting from the Sunderland Echo which shows Gerald (2nd left) receving engineering apprentice of the year award at James A Jobling glassworks in 1962

The Re:collections exhibition, which is on display until April 19, also features screen-prints inspired by the story collection, made by County Durham school children.

Sunderland University student Sarah Heseltine, who is in her third year studying a masters in glass and ceramics, said: “I work part-time at the Glass Centre and one of my colleagues suggested I get involved in the project as I’m really interested in community art and outreach projects.

“I actually ended up using this project for my dissertation, about how the use of web and social media can engage people in arts.”

The exhibition features individual pieces based on the participants’ personal connections to glass.

Speaking about her audiovisual, Sarah said: “My piece is called Hide and Seek and is inspired by the National Glass Centre being used by both the public and students.

“Not many people know about the work done by students, so the hide and seek idea is about seeing behind the scenes, into students hiding and seeking big opportunities.

“It also features my own story and interest in glass.”

Speaking about working with the other Re:collections participants, she said: “I think the variety of people who worked on this project is absolutely brilliant, it’s certainly opened my eyes.

“It was great to see everyone’s different experiences of glass from Pyrex, through to modern glass.

“Some people have used precious memories and photographs.

“Hearing their stories really made me smile.”