Sam Allardyce: Why I didn’t bring Peter Reid back to Sunderland

Peter Reid in his reign as Sunderland manager, welcoming Niall Quinn to Roker Park
Peter Reid in his reign as Sunderland manager, welcoming Niall Quinn to Roker Park
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Sam Allardyce has explained why he opted against including former Sunderland manager Peter Reid in his backroom team.

Reid was one of the names linked with becoming Allardyce’s assistant manager at the Stadium of Light, before ex-Sunderland midfielder Paul Bracewell was appointed as the new number two last week.

As much as I know Reidy would have loved to come back, I have to stick to my own beliefs

Sam Allardyce

The Echo understands that Reid was interested in the position, to return to the club where he spent seven years in charge.

But Allardyce – who has known Reid since their playing days together at Bolton in the 1970s – did not want to put his friendship with the Scouser in jeopardy by working alongside him in the dug-out.

Allardyce told the Echo: “Reidy is a very good friend and I’ve never been a believer in appointing friends in coaching.

“One of my best friendships dwindled in the pub business – we still talk, but it challenged that friendship too much – and that taught me to go into football and find people that I can have good relations with but without being over-friendly.

“Would I have like to have done? Yes, I would. But I’ve always had that policy.

“As much as I know Reidy would have loved to come back, I have to stick to my own beliefs.”

The two clubs which Reid is most closely associated with, meet on Sunday, when Sunderland head to Everton vying to build on their elusive maiden win of the campaign against Newcastle United last weekend.

Sunderland have registered two back-to-back wins at Goodison Park – after previously enduring a 17-year barren stretch there - and face an Everton side who have taken only one point from their last three games.

And Allardyce believes that if Sunderland are still in the game heading into the final stages on Merseyside, then an Everton side who played 120 minutes on Tuesday night in the Capital One Cup, could begin to suffer from fatigue.

“Everton have got a few injury problems and they played in midweek in the Capital One Cup, and had to go to extra-time and penalties to beat Norwich,” added Allardyce.

“We could take advantage of that if we’re in the game late on.

“If we are drawing or in front, it could perhaps be difficult for Everton to come back by that stage.

“I’ve got to get the players to use that mental desire to get a result out of the game.”