Hundreds turn out for Wonderlands graphic novel exhibition in Sunderland

Wonderlands graphic novel exhibition in Sunderland.
Wonderlands graphic novel exhibition in Sunderland.
0
Have your say

Fans turned out in force for a graphic novel event on Wearside.

Hundreds of people went along to Sunderland's Wonderlands expo, at the city's CitySpace site at Sunderland University.

Hannah Matterson, far right, with graphic novelist Bryan Talbot, middle, at Wonderlands.

Hannah Matterson, far right, with graphic novelist Bryan Talbot, middle, at Wonderlands.

Talks, panels and demonstrations have taken place as part of the fun.

The programme is being curated by Bryan Talbot, who has written and drawn comics and graphic novels for more than 30 years.

His best-known works include Judge Dredd, The Tale of One Bad Rat and Alice in Sunderland.

The Guardian cartoonist Steve Bell and Doug Braithwaite, ­who has drawn just about every major character in both the Marvel and DC comics, were also present.

Wonderlands exhibition.

Wonderlands exhibition.

Hannah Matterson, from Sunderland's Mac Trust which has been involved in putting on the event, told the Echo: "There's been a great turnout here today.

"We've had a few hundred people come out and meet over 40 different graphic novelists and artists and it's great that they have all descended on Sunderland.

"Wonderlands isn't a commercial event, so it's not like a comic con. It's more focused on the artistic and literary side of graphic novels."

The free to attend event included a number of presentations and a talk from Sha Nazir and Laurence Grove from Glasgow University on The Glasgow Looking Glass, which is regarded as the first mass-produced comic book that was published with illustrations.

Details of the Wonderlands exhibition.

Details of the Wonderlands exhibition.

Other presentations, talks and panel discussions explored topics from self-publishing to the history of UK graphic novels.

Hannah added that a wide range of people had been attending the event.

"We've had kids aged four, five and six up to people in their 70s coming along so that shows it's a totally inclusive exhibition," she said.