Letters, Tuesday, September 16, 2014

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Axe tax camp is gaining support

IN a combined effort, Labour and Lib-Dem MPs wiped the floor of the House of Commons with the Tories.

 It was on a vote to gain concessions from the uncompromising Bedroom Tax policy.

 It seems the force of the “axe the tax” argument is gaining some ground, even in the Tory ranks when a three-line whip failed to muster 70 of their MPs.

 Perhaps this was because a report for the Department of Work and Pensions stated that hardly any tenants are downsizing and many are sinking into poverty and arrears.

 The Bill that beat the Tories demanded the withdrawal of the spare Bedroom Tax where tenants were unable to downsize and also to exempt the disabled, who are currently being inhumanely made to leave their homes, which have been specially adapted for their individual disabilities.

 The House of Lords included a similar exemption in the original legislation. The unsympathetic Tories, along with the Lib-Dems, however cancelled it out in the Commons.

 There’s still a long hard road ahead for the victims of this heinous tax.

 Parliamentary battles will slow down the process before it gets to the statue book. Labour could be in power by then and it would have abolished the Bedroom Tax completely.

W Quinn

Political parties take moral stance

WITH national elections on the horizon, we now have certain political parties taking a vociferous and moral stance on the issue of the ‘spare room tax’, after much silence on the issue.

 The arguments against the ‘spare room tax’ are too many to enlist.

 However, people who live in houses which were previously owned by local councils and are now owned by private housing associations, are therefor liable to pay this tax, and suffer financially as a result of not being able to find a job, not having the resources to find a smaller property, or even enough money to move house, or are on zero-hour contracts. 

 The policy of the so called ‘spare room subsidy’ was thought up by extremely rich politicians who live in the south of England and haven’t a clue about what is going on north of Watford!

Euan Tipe,

Fulwell

I am proud to be an Englishman

SO some people, among them R Thomlinson, want to become Scots. Well I’ve no desire to be a Scot and I even prefer being English to being British or European.

 It’s very easy for those who wish to become Scottish to do so. All they need to do is go to the bus or railway station and ask for one way ticket to Edinburgh and on arriving claim political asylum.

 On their way to Scotland they will pass about thousands of Scots heading for England.

Joseph Young