Letters, Friday, September 7, 2012

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Forget Blackpool, let’s talk St Tropez

The Echo reported on Monday that Seaburn and Roker will 
be receiving an “ambitious” facelift.

Don’t be fooled, it is merely groundwork, a well overdue update.

The truth is the council is missing a trick.

As many will appreciate, Barnes Park’s regeneration is a complete success.

It could be the thriftier climate we find ourselves in, but the park has become popular, well-used and family friendly.

This was a place that only the year before its overhaul many locals wouldn’t enter alone, with many no go areas.

This is only a small example, but if a park can be turned around so swiftly, it isn’t beyond Sunderland to turn our coast back a number of years to a bustling, outdoor, family attraction.

Forget those cringe-worthy calls to become a North East Blackpool or a stag and hen do Mecca.

The paving and road system improvements are a start, only I would like to see some real progress made.

If the most could be made of our coastline, it is the one thing which sets us apart as a city in this region.

Make the most of it. The sooner the better. Direct our resources towards that, gain a little bit of the tourism which sweeps into the region every year.

Bring back the illuminations and follow on a theme of the city of light, but that’s where the connection to a certain North West seaside destination should end.

Seaburn and Roker of the future, think the relaxed European café culture of St Tropez rather than the outdated stick of rock and bag of chips to content the more demanding generation for the 21st century.

G. Engel

High Barnes

Silenced majority

It was nice of Tahir Khan (Sunderland Unity Organisation) to remind us of the hard won freedoms we once took for granted.

Thanks to the intolerant “Liberal” element who largely dictate how this country is run, our right to free speech, thought and conscience, has been steadily eroded, to the point where many decent, ordinary people, now believe it’s only the voices of minority groups which are being heard.

Despite the claims of these so-called “multicultural” and “equality” organisations, the fact is, there is no recognised body representing any of the indigenous communities.

Anyone trying to speak on our behalf is routinely branded racist, which might explain why there are thousands of charities specifically for the ethnic minorities, but only a handful for the Scottish, Welsh and Irish, and just one for the English.

One wonders if the council would have been so accomodating if it had been one of the local communities that had applied 
to open a cultural/communal centre.

Somehow I think we all know the answer to that?

M Brown

Hendon Road

Sunderland

He’s poison Pen

I READ with dismay the letter from Mick ‘The Pen’ Brown regarding how easy is easy it is to pass exams these days compared to his day.

 I thought that some of his views were quite outrageous. I would imagine that students all over the city were fuming when they read the article.

 My two daughters have achieved high grades in the past few years at A-level and GCSE. They achieved this giving up social time and working hard. They are both now at University and I am very proud of them.

 I don’t know who this Mick The Pen character is and I have no desire to meet him, but judging by the articles he writes, I would suggest that he is a very old man who has nothing to do but complain.

I have even read letters from him in the past where he has complained to the Echo about what old ladies are discussing in the post office queue.

I really cannot understand why the Echo would want to print such a diatribe.

 I have brought up my daughters to respect the elderly but unfortunately with people like Mick The Pen around, it’s mission impossible.

Dorothy Lambert,

Newcastle Road,

Sunderland

Put in the shade

HAVING only read press reviews and word of mouth comments re: the book 50 Shades of Grey, 
I wonder if the lady who condemns and wishes the 
burning of the book has visited the crime shelves at the Central Library, Fawcett Street, where there are numerous authors, mostly female, whose vivid imagination of sexual deviations make 50 Shades Of Grey seem rather tame.

Me thinks the lady doth protest too much.

Joan Murno

Sunderland