‘When the Boat Comes In’ fish pie recipe makes the menu for Sunderland’s revamped National Glass Centre

National Glass Centre chef Patrick Lesca, picture with Rona Williamson, who designed the signature dish and glass artist Katya Filmus who has designed the serving dishes and plates.
National Glass Centre chef Patrick Lesca, picture with Rona Williamson, who designed the signature dish and glass artist Katya Filmus who has designed the serving dishes and plates.
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A DISH inspired by a classic North East television series will take pride of place on a new restaurant menu.

Rhona Williamson picked up a tasty first prize in an Echo competition to create a meal for the National Glass Centre’s new brasserie.

Rhona, of Thornhill, entered the Signature Dish competition with an old family recipe for fish pie called “When the Boat Comes In”, and it proved a winner with judges who picked it from scores of others for the menu at cultural venue’s new eatery which will open this Saturday.

The arts centre has been undergoing a £2.3million revamp, and the brasserie has been taken over by head chef Patrick Lesca who will be cooking up traditional regional food – with a modern twist.

Rhona is delighted her family favourite will also be on offer.

She said: “The idea was to create a dish which represented the region, and I thought my family fish pie would fit perfectly.

“The TV series of the same name, which ran in the late 70s and early 80s really helped put the region on the map, so I thought it would be fitting.”

Rhona’s recipe will remain on the menu for the first season of opening and, as part of her prize, she will also enjoy a three-course meal for two, as well as receiving a bespoke piece of glass from the centre’s Studio Range. Entries were judged by chef Patrick Lesca and Michelle Daurat, National Glass Centre’s head of business and operations.

The aim of the revamped venue is to create an internationally-recognised arts centre on a par with the likes of the Baltic in Gateshead. Exhibition space has doubled, helping create a series of galleries providing temporary homes to some of the world’s leading glass and ceramic artists, and a permanent exhibition will tell the story of glassmaking in the city.