Sunderland director’s fantasy film is screened across the globe

David Cave, of Woodland Terrace, Pensahw,  who's film Dystopia St who's film is being shown at film festivals around the world.
David Cave, of Woodland Terrace, Pensahw, who's film Dystopia St who's film is being shown at film festivals around the world.
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A FANTASY film by a Wearside man is hitting screens around the world.

Written and directed by David Cave, from Penshaw, Dystopia St has been picked up by film festivals in far-flung corners of the globe including Australia, Brazil and Serbia.

Its story, based on David’s dreams over the years, has proved popular and is due to be shown at the Sci-Fi on the Rock film festival in Canada next month and at Independent Days 12 film festival in Germany in May.

He said: “Over a number of years, I’ve jotted down images from dreams I’ve had in a book with a view to making them into a film.

“I wanted to keep the film in that sense. It’s difficult to describe without seeing the film, but it doesn’t have a running narrative, it’s more ‘randomised’, so very much like a dream in that sense.”

The film, shot in an old mental hospital in Northumberland, is about a man trapped in a nightmare world who must confront his darkest fears if he is to unravel the mystery of his plight and find the key to his escape.

It stars actor Danny Shayler who also stars in film H10 which is due to be released in cinemas this year.

David, who has been compared to American filmmaker David Lynch by critics, said: “I’m really proud of the response the film’s been getting.

“The problem with short films is that it’s very hard to get them seen. All short film-makers hope to get their films seen by as many people as possible. I’m hoping that the film will continue to be screened at festivals throughout the year.”

David is currently looking for finance for his next short film, a fantasy drama entitled Girl and a Scar.

He is also working with actor John McMahon, from Newcastle, and camera operator Paul Green, from Rickleton, Washington, on One For All Productions, a community film-making partnership aimed at giving a voice to film-makers.

David says that the swathe of arts funding cuts have hit regional film-makers hard.

“Since the UK Film Council was axed, it’s difficult to get funding,” he explained.

“There are a lot of film-makers going out there and making stuff off their own back but if you want to do CGI effects and prosthetics properly it’s not cheap.”

Twitter: @sunechokaty