Sunderland cemetery shows first signs of remembrance

The launch of the new information plaque at Sunderland Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, where a new UK-wide strategy is aimed at increasing awareness of the 300,000 men and women whose war graves are to be found in the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission is launching a new information programme, which will see the erection of information boards at cemeteries across the country. Pictured is Kevan Jones MP for North Durham and Commissioner for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and Stephen Liversage, Regional Supervisor for the CWGC at Bishopwearmouth Cemetery.
The launch of the new information plaque at Sunderland Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, where a new UK-wide strategy is aimed at increasing awareness of the 300,000 men and women whose war graves are to be found in the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission is launching a new information programme, which will see the erection of information boards at cemeteries across the country. Pictured is Kevan Jones MP for North Durham and Commissioner for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and Stephen Liversage, Regional Supervisor for the CWGC at Bishopwearmouth Cemetery.
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BISHOPWEARMOUTH Cemetery has become one of the first in the country to mark its pride in those who died for their country.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission aims to increase awareness of the 300,000 men and women whose war graves are to be found in at cemeteries across the country.

Now signs have gone up at the Chester Road cemetery, letting people know it is the final resting place of First World War and Second World War military personnel.

North Durham MP and War Graves Commissioner Kevan Jones has backed the initiative, saying: “Men and women from all over North East England died serving their country in both world wars, and the immense sacrifice which they made should never be forgotten.”

One of those buried at the cemetery is Bombardier Henry Herbert Reed, who was posthumously awarded The George Cross in 1941.

The London Gazette of September 19, 1941, read: “When the ship was attacked by enemy aircraft with cannon, machine guns and bombs, Gunner Reed behaved with the utmost gallantry.

“Although badly wounded, he carried the Chief Officer, also badly wounded, down two ladders to the deck below and placed him in shelter near a lifeboat. Gunner Reed then died. By his gallant and utterly selfless action he saved the life of the Chief Officer.”