Sunderland bottom of Premier League house price table - with rivals Newcastle in mid-table

File photo dated 02/10/2012 of a general view of an estate agent's 'Sold' sign outside a property, as house prices increased at their fastest rate in three years in July in further signs of a market revival, Nationwide has reported. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Friday August 2, 2013. The 3.9% year-on-year rise is the strongest annual upswing recorded since August 2010 and takes average prices to �170,825, according to the building society's figures. See PA story ECONOMY House. Photo credit should read: Chris Ison/PA Wire

File photo dated 02/10/2012 of a general view of an estate agent's 'Sold' sign outside a property, as house prices increased at their fastest rate in three years in July in further signs of a market revival, Nationwide has reported. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Friday August 2, 2013. The 3.9% year-on-year rise is the strongest annual upswing recorded since August 2010 and takes average prices to �170,825, according to the building society's figures. See PA story ECONOMY House. Photo credit should read: Chris Ison/PA Wire

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Sunderland may have escaped the drop in last season’s Barclays Premier League but the Black Cats are bottom when it comes to falling house prices.

With the latest Premier League season starting on Saturday, new research from Nationwide Building Society has crowned London club Crystal Palace as champions of this year’s House Price Premier League, after the average cost of a house in the area rose by 17 per cent in the past year.

Across the UK, the annual pace of house price growth continues to slow – a trend that has been in evidence since mid-2014.

The league, which is based on the annual percentage change in house prices1, shows the Eagles would top the table with West Ham United, Watford and Norwich City taking the remaining top four spots.

At the other end of spectrum, Manchester United would be relegated alongside Stoke City and Sunderland propping up the league.

Croydon, home to Palace’s Selhurst Park Stadium, has seen house prices rise by 17 per cent over the 12 month period to June 2015.

At the opposite end, Trafford, home to Manchester United, has seen only a one per cent increase over the same period, while Stoke saw no annual house price growth at all.

Sunderland are placed bottom of the table as the only one of the 20 Premier League areas experiencing negative annual growth, with average prices in the area around the Stadium of Light at £150,552.

Between June 2014 and June 2015, house prices on Wearside fell by four per cent.

Neighbours Newcastle United fared much better, with average property prices increasing by four per cent to an average of £190,790.

This year’s annual growth figures are lower than last year reflecting trends in the broader housing market.

In 2014, Tottenham Hotspur won the league because Haringey, home to Spurs’ White Hart Lane Stadium, had seen growth of 32 per cent, which is 15 per cent higher than Crystal Palace’s winning growth rate this year.

There are a number of changes in this year’s house price league compared to the 2014 version.

North London has seen a significant slowing in annual house price growth with Haringey falling from 32 per cent in June 2014 to just three per cent in 2015.

“As a result, Spurs fall from being champions to coming 12th.

Islington, home to the Emirates Stadium, saw its annual house price growth slow from 23 per cent to just three per cent, meaning Arsenal drop ten places to 14th in the table.

The biggest gainers in the 2015 league are Aston Villa, which jumped ten places in the league to fifth, despite the annual growth rate in Birmingham slowing from ten per cent to six per cent. Newcastle rises eight places in this year’s league to tenth, with the pace of growth over the last 12 months increasing from three per cent to four per cent.

Alan Oliver, Nationwide’s head of external affairs, said: “Our latest figures once again show that success on the pitch doesn’t always mean high house price growth.

“The prime example is Manchester Utd – top four in the Premier League but relegation zone in the house price equivalent.

“In fact, half of the teams in the top ten of the ‘House Price Premier League’ finished in the bottom half of last season’s Premier League.

“The data also shows that areas containing Premier League football stadia are not immune from the wider national house price picture as annual growth rates are down.

“Across the UK, the annual pace of house price growth continues to slow – a trend that has been in evidence since mid-2014.

“In fact, in our most recent regional report, 11 of the 13 UK regions saw a slowdown in annual rate of growth in the second quarter of 2015.”