Street sports day honours tragic Sunderland teenager Shane Sloan

Shane's mun Karen Hetherington with her husband Dave and daughter and Shane's sister Samanatha.
Shane's mun Karen Hetherington with her husband Dave and daughter and Shane's sister Samanatha.
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A Sunderland teenager who died in a car crash has been remembered in the way he would have loved.

Shane Sloan, known as Shorty, was a dedicated fan of street sports such as skateboarding and BMX.

The Shane 'Shorty' Sloan  Memorial Skae and BMX competition was held at the Override Indoor Skate park, Shaftsbury Avenue, South Shiekds, on Saturday.

The Shane 'Shorty' Sloan Memorial Skae and BMX competition was held at the Override Indoor Skate park, Shaftsbury Avenue, South Shiekds, on Saturday.

And he was remembered with a competition held at the Override Indoor Skatepark in South Shields.

Shane Sloan, 18, from Penshaw, had only just passed his driving test when the Citroen Saxo he was travelling in hit a lamppost in Mount Pleasant, Washington, in 2011.

The former Biddick Community Sports College pupil was taken to Sunderland Royal Hospital with serious head injuries, but died after a five-day battle for life.

Shane was training to be a mechanic at college, but had a promising skate-boarding career ahead of him and was waiting for a sponsor to go professional.

Shane lived for his skateboard.

Karen Hetherington

Mum Karen Hetherington said a street sports competition was the ideal way to remember her son.

“Shane lived for his skateboard,” she said. “That is why we decided to do this in the first place.

“He always used to say ‘There aren’t any competitions to take part in,’ so we decided that was what we wanted to do.

“It has been six years since we started doing this and

Shane Sloan.

Shane Sloan.

“The day went well - we had over 40 children taking part, so it was not too bad. We had enough people there to make it a good day.

“Guy Page won the BMX section, Josh Young won the scooter and Luke Tulip won the skateboard competition.”

Karen and the other organisers are already looking forward to next year’s event.

Karen is keen to expand the day, but without losing sight of what inspired it in the first place : “We are going to start planning early this year,” she said.

“We are thinking about possibly making it into an all-day event, having stalls and bouncy castles there to make it more of a family day.”