Schoolgirl’s gift of hair

Olivia Cuthbert has her haircut finished after taking part in a charity hair cut recently, by Tracy Gumbleton-Wood manager Spoilt Rotten, Holmeside, Sunderland.

Olivia Cuthbert has her haircut finished after taking part in a charity hair cut recently, by Tracy Gumbleton-Wood manager Spoilt Rotten, Holmeside, Sunderland.

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SCHOOLGIRL Olivia Cuthbert shows off her new hairstyle – after her 28in locks were cut off in support of a charity drive.

The eight-year-old, from Beckwith Grange, Doxford, had her “bum length” hair lopped off to raise money for the Make A Wish Foundation.

Her plaits were also sent to the Little Princess Trust to be made into a wig for children with cancer.

The stunt raised more than £1,000 for the foundation.

Her sister, Stacey Smart, said: “We’re all really proud of her.

“She was determined to go through with it.”

The pupil at Mill Hill Primary decided to attempt the fund-raiser after watching a TV soap opera, which featured a storyline about a young cancer sufferer.

“I think it was a bit of a shock to her that someone so young could be struck down with cancer,” said Stacey.

“She was really touched by it and wanted to do something to help.”

The family’s local Morrisons supermarket offered to host the event while hairdressers Spoilt Rotten, in Holmeside, carried out the re-styling.

“People were really supportive of Olivia in both the run-up to the event and at the event itself,” said Stacey.

“We had a good response from the sponsorship appeal and we also held a collection on the day.

“Everyone was very generous.

“We want to thank them all.”

Olivia said she hoped her efforts would “make a difference”.

“I really wanted to do something to help,” she said.

The Make-A-Wish Foundation grants “magical wishes” to children and young people fighting life-threatening conditions.

Since being established in the UK in 1986, it has granted more than 8,500 “wishes”, including dream holidays and trips.

The Little Princess Trust provides real-hair wigs to boys and girls, across the UK and Ireland, who have lost their own hair through cancer treatment.

The trust relies solely on the efforts of enthusiastic community fund-raisers and receives no formal funding.