Pupils recruited to drive out trouble

Police officers with pupils from Richard Avenue Primary School, Sunderland, during a tour of the area close to the school,  showing them the consequences of anti-social behaviour
Police officers with pupils from Richard Avenue Primary School, Sunderland, during a tour of the area close to the school, showing them the consequences of anti-social behaviour
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SUNDERLAND pupils saw first hand the consequences of antisocial behaviour when they visited a trouble hot spot with police.

The group of 60 children from Richard Avenue Primary School joined officers for a walk along the Eden Vale mineral line to learn a lesson on the effects of antisocial behaviour in the area.

Police officers with pupils from Richard Avenue Primary School, Sunderland, during a tour of the area close to the school,  showing them the consequences of anti-social behaviour

Police officers with pupils from Richard Avenue Primary School, Sunderland, during a tour of the area close to the school, showing them the consequences of anti-social behaviour

Eden Vale has been plagued with underage boozers, graffiti and vandalism in the past and as part of a crackdown, police decided to raise awareness of the troubles with younger children.

The aim is to show them what effect the disorder is having on the community to help stop them from becoming involved in the future.

Pc Paul McEvoy, of Sunderland West Neighbourhood Policing Team, said: “It’s unfortunate that this area has been a hot spot for youth disorder and underage drinking and an area that concerns residents the most.

“We’ve been working closely with partner agencies, including the council, local schools and local youth projects to help tackle the issue and this walkabout is just one of the tactics we’re using.

“Our aim is to raise awareness the effect antisocial behaviour has on the community at a young age to help stop the children becoming involved in this type of behaviour when they’re older.

“The majority of these children will be too young to be involved in the disorder at the moment, but it could be their older siblings are and letting them see the consequences of it could help deter them.

“Not only that it gives us the opportunity to break down barriers between police and younger people, many of these children may never have spoken to a police officer before and it gives them the chance to find out what we do and ask us any questions.”