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Poppy plaques placed on homes of First World War heroes

Members of the Durham Pals First World War re--enactment society helped to launch the new Poppy Project by the Wessington U3A war Memorials Group at Fatfield, on Saturday. the Groups aim is to place a brass poppy on each of the houses where First World War dead lived. In South View, Fatfield on Saturday five houses were marked with a poppy and others within the village.

Members of the Durham Pals First World War re--enactment society helped to launch the new Poppy Project by the Wessington U3A war Memorials Group at Fatfield, on Saturday. the Groups aim is to place a brass poppy on each of the houses where First World War dead lived. In South View, Fatfield on Saturday five houses were marked with a poppy and others within the village.

SCULPTURES of poppies have been placed at the homes and workplaces of war heroes as history enthusiasts work to recognise their sacrifice.

Washington-based Wessington University of the Third Age has held its first ceremony as part of its campaign to honour those lost in the First World War.

Up to 80 addresses could be adorned with poppy sculptures commissioned by the group and created by town artist Allan Scott.

Home addresses, the houses belonging to the widows of war dead at the end of the conflict and buildings where the soldiers worked before they fought, will be presented with their flower.

The project has been backed by Sunderland City Council’s Community Chest fund, which has helped cover the cost of the artwork.

A crowd gathered as members of Durham Reenactment Group pulled on military and wartime outfits, with Beamish Museum helping to supply the clothing.

Peter Welsh, a member of the history group, said: “It really seems to have a resonance with people.

“People were over the moon to see us and were coming out of their houses excited and putting the kettle on for coffee and tea. They were very positive.”

Letters have been sent to the owners of the homes and properties which remain standing to ask them if they would agree to a poppy going up on their wall as the research continues from documents and Washington’s three war memorials.

Saturday’s ceremony saw poppies put on houses in South View to recognise Michael Kelly, of the Yorkshire Regiment, Dr David Anderson, who was in the Royal Army Medical Corp, Alfred Brown, whose regiment is not known but is listed on a memorial, and John William Noble, who was in the Royal Scots.

Others were placed in West Bridge Street, where brothers John Frederick and Alfred Henry Potter lived, and the home of Willie Appleby, a member of the Durham Light Infantry.

The River Bar, where the Co-Op was once based, is another location which could be decorated with a poppy, as a draper and butcher who died on the battlefield had worked there before they left to fight for Britain. The project has begun with recognising those who died in the First World War.

Poppies will also appear on properties in Dorcas Terrace, Harraton Terrace, Wormhill Terrace, Emmerson Terrace, Nelson Street, Derwent Terrace, Holyoake Terrace, Spout Lane, Musgrave Terrace, Biddick Terrace and Westfield Crescent, as the centenary of the conflict is marked.

The group is then likely to move on to the addresses of those who died in the Second World War.

Anyone who would like more information can call Peter on 417 6286.

 

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