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Polish film and art festival gets underway in Sunderland

Sunderland's Play Poland Film Festival has been held as part of the national Made in Poland celebrations, left to right; The Mayor and Mayoress of the City of Sunderland Councillors Iain Kay and Barbara McLennan, Michal Chantkowski from ICOS (International Community Organisation of Sunderland) and festival organisers Daniel Krzyszczak and Danka Kudlacik.

Sunderland's Play Poland Film Festival has been held as part of the national Made in Poland celebrations, left to right; The Mayor and Mayoress of the City of Sunderland Councillors Iain Kay and Barbara McLennan, Michal Chantkowski from ICOS (International Community Organisation of Sunderland) and festival organisers Daniel Krzyszczak and Danka Kudlacik.

BE in pole position at a new festival which merges foreign film with art.

As part of the nationwide Play Poland Film Festival, Infinite Arts in Sunniside, Sunderland, is screening Polish films and is hosting a one-of-a-kind art installation.

Aimed at giving Brits a taste of Poland, the opening event at the Nile Street-based studio screened Polish documentaries, animations and short films running in partnership with the T-Mobile New Horizon International Film Festival.

Until Friday, between 5pm and 9pm daily, visitors to the studio will be able to view Poster of Imagination, an exhibition of film posters.

Though the 40 famous film posters are by Polish artists including Edward Lutczyn and Henryk Sawka, they promote English language films by the likes of Steven Spielberg, Alfred Hitchcock, Clint Eastwood and Francis Ford Coppola.

A spokeswoman said: “The posters owe their uniqueness to the clash of Polish grey socialism synonymous with that period of the Cold War and the tempting vibrancy of colour that only comes from a Hollywood production.”

This is the first time Wearside has taken part in the Play Poland Film Festival, which has grown to become a permanent fixture in other UK cities.

Daniel Krzyszczak from multicultural group Icos (International Community Organisation of Sunderland) based in Foyle Street, Sunniside, said the festival was a great way to foster links between Sunderland’s increasingly diverse population.

“The festival has been held in Newcastle for a number of years as it’s easier to find venues and sponsors, but this year, for the first time, we have managed to include Sunderland,” he said.

“I am really looking forward to the activities in Nile Street and I’m really proud that it is taking place here.

“It’s difficult to know the exact number of people from Poland now living in Sunderland until we get a census report but it’s a number that’s growing all the time. There are a few tensions but people are becoming more accepting.”

Twitter: @sunechokaty

 
 
 

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