More than just tea and sympathy after Japan earthquake and tsunami

Yoshiko Moss, from Brancepeth Chare in Peterlee, who will be demonstrating the Japanese art of tea-making to help raise funds for those affected by the recent Japanese earthquake and tsunami...
Yoshiko Moss, from Brancepeth Chare in Peterlee, who will be demonstrating the Japanese art of tea-making to help raise funds for those affected by the recent Japanese earthquake and tsunami...
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A JAPANESE woman living in Peterlee is doing her bit for victims of the earthquake and tsunami that hit her home country.

Yoshiko Moss is originally from Sendai, the coastal city with a population of one million people which bore the brunt of the disaster.

For the past 25 years she has lived in Peterlee with her husband Charles, a business lecturer at Sunderland University.

On Thursday, May 12, between 1.30pm and 3.30pm, at Peterlee Town Council’s Shotton Hall, Mrs Moss will host a traditional Japanese tea ceremony to raise funds for the victims of the quake and the following tsunami.

There will be tea, coffee, biscuits and entertainment from children performing traditional Japanese dances called The Moon Over the Ruined Castle and Cherry Blossom. It will be an ideal introduction to Japanese culture.

The event is free to attend, but donations to the disaster appeal are encouraged.

The 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck the coast of Japan on March 11. Latest figures confirm 14,063 deaths, 4,916 injured and 14,175 missing.

Mrs Moss said: “I asked Peterlee Town Council to support me in raising money for the disaster and they agreed.

“Most people in Sendai have got electricity and gas, but there are problems because of the nuclear power plant and people are frightened to eat the food because of radiation.

“Frozen fish is being brought in from abroad and other parts of Japan because of contamination.

“There are food shortages and long queues at the supermarket. The government is supplying drinking water, but there is no running water, so they are using snow or pond water for bathing. They also need about 100,000 temporary houses.

“We don’t know for sure how many people are missing. My family and friends are lucky because they missed the worst of it as they live in the centre of Sendai away from the coast.

“But they are still frightened because of the aftershocks, which happen about 20 times a day.”