Man stabbed friend in the face, head and chest

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A KNIFEMAN stabbed his friend’s face, scalp and chest in a terrifying and bloody attack.

Edward Garbutt lashed out at Charles Docherty during a drinking session at a mutual pal’s home in Southwick, Sunderland, in March.

Newcastle Crown Court heard Mr Docherty, 46, suffered a collapsed lung as a result of a deep wound to his chest and his face was covered in blood from multiple injuries to his head.

Judge John Evans jailed Garbutt for five-and-a-half years for what was described as a “frenzied attack.”

The judge told him: “Why you should behave in this way is difficult to discover.

“You stabbed someone who, up until March 19 this year, you regarded as a friend.

“It is clear, looking at the medical evidence in this case and the photographs, that this was a frenzied attack.”

Despite the seriousness of the assault, which led to a three-day hospital stay, Mr Docherty cannot remember what exactly happened to him.

Prosecutor Paul Rowland told the court the attack happened when the householder had briefly left the room they were all drinking in.

Mr Rowland said: “He noticed the complainant’s face was covered in blood.

“Mr Docherty made the comment this defendant had stabbed him.

“He had numerous superficial wounds.

“The man wound he had was a knife wound to the chest which resulted in a collapsed left lung.

“He had multiple superficial wounds over his chest wall and left hand, also over his face and scalp.”

Mr Docherty’s serious chest wound was fitted with a drain and stitched.

Mr Rowland added: “The victim can remember going to the shop and drinking.

“Of the actual incident, he has no recollection whatsoever.”

Garbutt, 40, of Collingwood Court, Sulgrave, Washington, admitted wounding with intent.

The court heard his only previous convictions are for being drunk and disorderly, and he had never been in trouble with the police at all until late last year.

Garbutt has a history of alcohol and mental health problems.

Andrew Finlay, defending, said: “One of the features in this case is the complete lack of evidence or explanation of why he committed the offence he did.

“There is nothing from the complainant and very little from the defendant.

“It seems to have been highly out of character for him to act in this way.”