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Why Durham Cathedral is becoming bird-friendly

Durham Cathedral has teamed with up with a Wearside mental health charit, the St Margarets Centre, to create bird feeders for its grounds.

Durham Cathedral has teamed with up with a Wearside mental health charit, the St Margarets Centre, to create bird feeders for its grounds.

FEATHERED visitors are being made welcome at a historical tourist attraction.

Durham Cathedral has teamed-with up with a mental health charity to create bird feeders for its grounds.

The cathedral’s Woodlands and Riverbanks team is working with the city’s St Margaret’s Centre to attract more wildlife to the World Heritage Site.

St Margaret’s Centre manager, Rob Chatwin, said: “One of our volunteers is a very experienced green wood worker and he has been leading sessions with our service users in the woodwork shop.

“The service users love activities like this, because it gives them a real sense of satisfaction and achievement, knowing that their handiwork is being put to good use in such a beautiful place.”

Grants from the Heritage Lottery Fund, The Banks Community Fund, Biffa Group and The Friends of Durham Cathedral paid for the feeders, which will be placed in trees on the Cathedral-owned peninsula, and are made out of wood from the site.

Pam Stewart, project officer for Durham Cathedral’s Woodlands and Riverbanks team, commissioned the work.

She said: “We are really pleased to be working with the St Margaret’s Centre on what we feel is a mutually-beneficial project.

“It is very befitting of our Christian ethos as an organisation that we try to enrich the lives of local people and look after the natural world around us.

“We are very grateful to St Margaret’s Centre for reusing the wood from our site to create the feeders and we hope that they will enjoy coming to watch the bird life.”

 

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