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‘We lost our girl like this too’ – grieving parents’ support for family of Sunderland girl killed in blind cord accident

Chris Parslow and partner Amanda from Tirley in Gloucestershire. Their daughter Sophia was strangled to death aged 17 months after she got caught in the cord of a window blind.

Chris Parslow and partner Amanda from Tirley in Gloucestershire. Their daughter Sophia was strangled to death aged 17 months after she got caught in the cord of a window blind.

A GRIEVING couple have received messages of support from around the world after the tragic death of their toddler daughter.

Sophie Allen died on Saturday after accidentally strangling herself on a window blind cord in her home in Red House, Sunderland, almost a week earlier.
The two-year-old was playing with brother Jayden, four, when tragedy struck.

Jayden alerted mum Danielle Hudson who found her behind the curtain, with the cord around her neck.

The 28-year-old freed Sophie and dialled 999.

The youngster spent six days fighting for her life, but died in the early hours of Saturday.

Now Danielle, and Sophie’s dad Peter Allen, want to raise awareness about the dangers of blind cords and see more regulations put in place.

One of the messages of support came from Amanda O’Halloran, who lost her 17-month-old daughter Sophia 10 months ago following an almost identical accident

Amanda, from Tirley in Gloucestershire, launched a campaign called Sophia’s Cause, calling for a ban on that particular design of blinds in a bid to prevent further tragedies.

She attracted more than 5,000 signatures in support.

Sophie’s heartbroken dad Peter is grateful for the messages of support.

He said: “Her little girl died 10 months ago and she got in touch with us on Facebook.

“She launched a campaign to ban these blinds completely. We want to make people aware that if they have blinds in rooms where children might be, then the cords need to be secured to the wall and out of reach.

“They should come with a fitting to do that, that’s what we want to see. Failing that, people should go out and buy something that will do it. It will only take a few minutes and a few pounds to do.”

In yesterday’s Echo, we told how little Sophie suffered brain damage because of the accident.

She was taken to Sunderland Royal Hospital, where staff worked for more than an hour to resuscitate her, before being transferred to Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary where she was placed in an induced coma.

Sophie was brought out of the coma after two days and started to breathe on her own, but there was no response to touch or sound.

An MRI confirmed she had brain damage and on Friday a scan showed there was no brain activity.

Danielle, who also has a baby daughter Amelia, said: “Blinds are something that practically every household has and in children’s bedrooms.

“Just tie them out of the way, keep them out of reach of children, cut them or take them down altogether – just make sure children have no access to them.”

Sophie’s siblings have been staying with relatives since the accident and only returned home yesterday

 

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