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BBC broadcaster helps mark 125 years of Sunderland photography club

BBC Look North presenter Jeff Brown, who's father was a keen photographer, was invited along to officially open the Sunderland Photographic Association's 125th Annual Print Exhibition at the Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens. Jeff is pictured here with the photographer of the winning print in the Open Monochrome Section, Cliff Banks.

BBC Look North presenter Jeff Brown, who's father was a keen photographer, was invited along to officially open the Sunderland Photographic Association's 125th Annual Print Exhibition at the Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens. Jeff is pictured here with the photographer of the winning print in the Open Monochrome Section, Cliff Banks.

BBC presenter Jeff Brown lens a hand at an exhibition to celebrate a photographic group’s 125th anniversary.

The Wearside-born Look North newsman helped the Sunderland Photographic Association mark its milestone with a bumper show.

Started in 1888, the club has about 40 members, from enthusiasts new to photography to celebrated lecturers.

The Annual Print Exhibition at the Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens showcases a range of the group’s work.

As well as awards for best colour and monochrome prints, the event saw Jeff, whose late father was a member of the group, honour its work and make presentations to winners.

Judy Beveridge, president of the association, said: “It was a very good day. There were 40 to 50 people attending, with a good representation from many other clubs in the North East.

“Jeff Brown gave an amusing talk referring to his late father’s involvement with the club.

“His father had been the club lanternist at some stage, which was a highly responsible position, and Jeff still had the badge his father would have worn when at the club.”

Ms Beveridge said the club has also been keen to move with the times and embrace new technology.

“There have been many changes since 1888, when 12 business and professional men of Sunderland decided to form a photographic society,” she said.

“Photography has developed over the years and the association has seen changes from cameras with glass plates to roll film, monochrome to colour, dark room processing to commercial for colour. Slides which played a big part in the club have disappeared and now we have digital photography, digital cameras and digital images.

“Camera development has also been quite dramatic, from large stand cameras to folding cameras, 35mm to SLR and auto focus.

“The introduction of powerful zoom lenses has made it possible for photographers to capture small distant objects with ease.

“Now we are at the point where cameras are on mobile phones and can be used quite unobtrusively.”

The exhibition, open to the public, will be at the venue’s Open Space Gallery until early May.

 

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