It’s a boy ... city celebrates Royal birth

ROYAL ANNOUNCEMENT: An easel stands in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace in London to announce the birth of a baby boy to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.
ROYAL ANNOUNCEMENT: An easel stands in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace in London to announce the birth of a baby boy to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.
0
Have your say

“WE are all over the moon.”

Sunderland City Council leader Coun Paul Watson led the Wearside welcome to the new Royal arrival last night.

Kensington Palace announced at 8.30pm that the Duchess of Cambridge had given birth to an 8lbs 6oz baby boy, who becomes third in line to the throne.

An announcement was placed on an easel outside the gates of Buckingham Palace.

“Her Royal Highness and her child are both doing well and will remain in hospital overnight,” said a statement.

“What fantastic news,” said Coun Watson.

“We have all been waiting for this.”

His Conservative opposite number Coun Robert Oliver was also delighted with the new heir.

“Congratulations to William and Kate,” he said.

“It is a wonderful day for them and it is a wonderful day for so many people in this country who love the Royal family.”

Prime Minister David Cameron said the “whole country will celebrate” the birth, while Labour leader Ed Miliband added: “Many congratulations to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. I wish them and their son all happiness and good health.”

The Royal baby is the first Prince of Cambridge to be born for more than 190 years.

He is a first grandchild for Prince Charles, but a third great-grandchild for the Queen – Princess Anne’s son Peter Phillips and wife Autumn have two daughters.

The birth means the monarchy has three generations of heirs to the throne for the first time since 1894, when Queen Victoria was alive at the same time as her son Edward (later Edward VII), his son George (later George V) and his son Edward.

No sooner had news of the birth been confirmed than attention turned to what the little prince will be called.

Charles Kidd, of Debrett’s Peerage and Baronetage, predicted a conventional choice.

“I do think that Prince William is quite a traditionalist – that’s my feeling,” he said.