Is it time we logged off and spent more time in the real world?

Adults spend more than eight hours a day on screens, and check their smartphones more than 150 times a day.

Adults spend more than eight hours a day on screens, and check their smartphones more than 150 times a day.

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Social etiquette once stated no phones at the dinner table, now we’re documenting every meal.

Bedtime was once for sleeping, now we’re wide awake with the glare of our smart-phone screens. Brits are in a serious, long term relationship with technology.

Award-winning digital entrepreneur and founder and owner of digital detox specialists Its Time To Log Off, Tanya Goodin.

Award-winning digital entrepreneur and founder and owner of digital detox specialists Its Time To Log Off, Tanya Goodin.

UK adults spend an average of 21.6 hours online each week (not including work), according to the annual Ofcom Media Attitudes Report 2016. Nearly nine in ten (87 per cent) of all UK adults said they use the internet (on any device) either at home or elsewhere, seven in 10 own and use a smartphone and a staggering 99 per cent of adults have taken at least once selfie (unofficial report). Evidently we’re a screen addicted nation.

Our dependency on the internet, social media and technology is so great that a number of studies have seen a direct link to usage and an increase in anxiety and depression. Intense social media and internet use is distorting every day reality and ironically disconnecting us from the real world.

We spoke with award-winning digital entrepreneur and founder and owner of digital detox specialists It’s Time To Log Off, Tanya Goodin, to find out how we can reconnect with the real world.

“Our use of technology has gotten completely unbalanced and we are now spending more time online than offline,” Tanya explains. “The evidence is mounting up through studies and research that this is bad for our focus, concentration, sleep and overall mental health.”

Internet and social media addiction disorder is a relatively new phenomenon but isn’t one completely unheard of. In fact this new addiction is such a global problem that the Japanese ministry of education introduced internet ‘fasting camps’ for more than half a million screen addicted children. It’s not just children glued to their phones though.

“Adults now spend more than eight hours a day on screens, and check their smartphones more than 150 times a day. But you don’t really don’t need statistics to show you how bad it is, just walk down any street, look round any restaurant, everyone is on their phones – all the time!”

Pressing the power off button might not be the easiest thing to do but the instant benefits of logging off will be immense.

A digital detox will increase productivity, improve real-life human relationships, help posture and most importantly boost mental health. Technology is so entwined in our lives how can we log off without feeling left out?

“Set boundaries around time and boundaries around place to help you log off occasionally. Technology is a wonderful thing but our always-on 24:7 digital lifestyle is what’s causing the problem,” advises Tanya.

“Boundaries around time could be ‘no work email after 8pm at night’ and boundaries around place could be ‘no phones in the bedroom’ or ‘no phones at the meal table’.”

To find out about It’s Time To Log Off, visit www.itstimetologoff.com.