Inspectors demand improvements at Seaham care home that breached regulations

The Cedar Court Care Home in Seaham, which was found to require improvement in a recent Care Quality Commission report.
The Cedar Court Care Home in Seaham, which was found to require improvement in a recent Care Quality Commission report.
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A care home has been ordered to improve by inspectors after it was found to be sub-standard in key areas.

Cedar Court was visited by Care Quality Commission (CQC) staff who discovered that hazards related to fire safety, people’s records were not confidentially maintained while some residents who needed glasses and hearing aids were not always supported by staff to wear them.

The Cedar Court Care Home in Seaham, which was found to require improvement in a recent Care Quality Commission report.

The Cedar Court Care Home in Seaham, which was found to require improvement in a recent Care Quality Commission report.

The home, in Portland Avenue, which cares for 68 people, was deemed to be breaching a number of regulations when it was visited back in April, although the report has only now been published by the CQC.

Bosses however say that since the visit a “robust action plan” has been put in place to address the issues.

The report read: “We looked at doors with the sign ‘Fire Door Keep Locked’ and found we could open the fires doors and behind some doors were walk in cupboards.

“This meant people were not protected from risks associated with fire.

Following the inspection in April we have put in place a robust action plan to address the areas identified as requiring improvement.

Cedar Court care home spokeswoman

“We spoke to the registered manager who agreed to seek advice from the local fire prevention officer regarding these doors.”

It added: “We looked at the external patio area and found the paving stones had subsided which caused trip hazards.

“We also found bathrooms to be cluttered with wheelchairs and toilet frames.

“This meant people were also put at risk of trips and falls and were unable to use these safely.”

Issues were also identified by the inspectors in relation residents’ nutrition and hydrational needs.

“We noted one person had lost a significant amount of weight loss,” said the report. 
“We were unable to establish from their care records what action had been taken since the weight loss began in the latter part of 2014.

“There was no up to date or specific care plan which clearly described the problem and actions to manage this weight loss.

“We noted a referral had recently been made to the Community Dietician.

“A visiting health professional provided us with an explanation of an underlying medical condition for which we found no care plan was in place for this same person.

“This meant the provider did not have in place up to date plans to support this person nutrition and hydration needs.”

In response to the report, a spokeswoman for the home said: “We work closely with the CQC and always take their feedback seriously.

“We are pleased the report highlights that the home has in place a refurbishment plan to improve the environment.

“Residents spoke positively to the CQC about feeling safe in the home, and staff treating them with respect and dignity.

“Following the inspection in April we have put in place a robust action plan to address the areas identified as requiring improvement.

“The health and wellbeing of the people we support is our number one priority and we look forward to showing full compliance at our next visit.”