Sunderland care home ordered to make improvements

The Lansbury Court Care Centre in Sunderland.
The Lansbury Court Care Centre in Sunderland.
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A care home on Wearside must improve, a watchdog has ordered.

An unannounced inspection was carried out at Lansbury Court Nursing Home, in Castletown, Sunderland, on June 15 by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

People are entitled to services which provide safe, effective, compassionate and high quality care.

Debbie Westhead, CQC’s deputy chief inspector for Adult Social Care in the North

A subsequent report said that the site is caring and well-led, but that areas of safety, effectiveness and responsiveness required improvement.

At the time of the inspection 40 people were using the service; with 15 people having general nursing needs, eight receiving residential support; 17 people living with dementia and six people visiting for respite care.

A summary of the report’s findings said: “Several people had been assessed as needing bed rails but we saw no evidence of best interest decisions or specific mental capacity assessments in relation to the use of them.

“This could amount to a restriction under deprivation of liberty safeguards.

“Staff training was not up to date and we saw no evidence that people had received an annual appraisal.

“The new manager had completed an introductory supervision session with staff since they had come into post but there was no evidence that supervisions had been completed prior to this point.”

Concerns have also been highlighted with regard to the protocol when dealing with residents’ medication.

“Medicines were administered safely but we found no evidence of medicine competencies,” said the report.

“Medicine protocols, care plans and risk assessments were not fully completed but the manager was addressing this via their action plan.”

A spokeswoman for Lansbury Court said: “We note the many positive comments from the inspection report. We take all feedback seriously and have put in place an action plan to address the matters raised by the inspector.

“We are confident that the home provides a safe and caring environment for our residents and are sure that our actions will satisfy the CQC.”

Debbie Westhead, CQC’s deputy chief inspector for Adult Social Care in the North, said: “People are entitled to services which provide safe, effective, compassionate and high-quality care.

“If that is what we find on inspection – we give the service a rating of good, or outstanding.

“If we find that a service requires improvement, we will expect them to provide us with a full plan setting out how they will address the issue.

“We will share our findings with local commissioners, and we will return in due course to check that they have made the required improvements.

“Whenever we find a service to be inadequate, we will consider taking further action on behalf of the people who use the service.”