Sunderland boy recovering after transplant operation

Karly Morris, of Claremot Drive, Shiney Row, with her son Bailey (5) who is making good priogress following a bone marrow transplant.
Karly Morris, of Claremot Drive, Shiney Row, with her son Bailey (5) who is making good priogress following a bone marrow transplant.
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LEUKAEMIA sufferer Bailey Cooper is on the mend after a life-saving transplant operation.

The Shiney Row five-year-old is back at his Claremont Drive home after doctors were able to give him bone marrow which was found through a foreign donor.

His transplant operation, which took place on July 12, was deemed a success by medics who are continuing to monitor his progress.

Bailey’s loving mum Karly Morris, 22, said today of her son’s progress: “He’s doing good.

“The transplant was very successful.

“He just sailed through it and was out in 25 days.”

Despite the successful op, Bailey is still prone to feeling tired as his body recovers.

“He’s got two infections at the minute but he is fighting them himself,” said Karly.

“The antibiotics they are treating him with, he is sensitive to them so he isn’t that well at times.

“He’s also had problems with his hips and he is going to have to go for scans on them.”

It is the second time Bailey has fought the illness, after first being diagnosed as a baby.

Aged two he was given the all-clear, only for it to return in March of this year.

The family were overjoyed when a consultant from the RVI phoned to say a matching donor had been found in May this year.

Karly has since discovered that the bone marrow came from a 22-year-old German man, and added that she finds it hard to put into words her and Bailey’s gratitude to the mystery person for their good deed. 
 “I just don’t think we can express how thankful we are to someone who we don’t know.

“We got an anonymous letter from him, saying how he was pleased that Bailey’s operation went well.”

Bailey, a pupil at Shiney Row Primary School, continues to have weekly checks at the RVI as surgeons monitor him.

But Karly is confident he will soon be able to get on with having the normal life of a young boy.

“He is off school and he has to stay in the house so he can’t even play out, which is hard when he sees the kids outside and he wants to be too.

“But he is doing really well and maybe by the start of next year he might be able to go back to school part-time.

“That’s something we are looking at.”