Ban for Washington care home nurse who snatched one resident's handbag and left another's room soiled

Maxine Butler was fired from St George's Residential Care Home at Harraton, Washington. Pic: Google Maps.
Maxine Butler was fired from St George's Residential Care Home at Harraton, Washington. Pic: Google Maps.
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A nurse who left a resident distraught by ripping her 'comfort handbag' from her grasp has been banned from the profession for a year.

Maxine Butler was fired from St George's Residential Care Home at Harraton, Washington, after the incident, and leaving she left another resident's room stained with faeces and urine.

The patient with the handbag wanted to leave the room, but Butler knew she would not go without it and snatched it from her, the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) heard.

The sobbing patient was so upset that two care assistants reported the incident to the home manager.

The NMC panel found the force which was used caused the patient to become agitated and increased her distress.

Butler was also found to have failed to maintain the cleanliness of the second resident's room.

The family of the resident made official complaints because they were so shocked at the standards of hygiene.

Following the complaints Butler was hauled in front of her bosses at a disciplinary hearing and was sacked.

Robert Barnwell, chairman of the NMC panel, said: "Mrs Butler's actions did fall seriously short of the conduct and standards expected of a nurse.

"Her failings were wide ranging and they were not limited to failings of a clinical nature.

"Patients could be placed at unwarranted risk of harm if Mrs Butler was allowed to practise without restriction.

"Mrs Butler failed to provide basic nursing care to vulnerable residents and patients and thereby breached a fundamental tenet of the profession.

"By not escalating these concerns, Mrs Butler failed to make her patients her first concern.

"In addition, Mrs Butler's handling of Patient K may have caused her emotional harm.

'Without any evidence of remediation or the requisite level of insight, the panel determined that there is a risk of repetition which would subsequently put patients at unwarranted risk of harm.

'The panel has concluded that a suspension order for a period of 12 months is the appropriate and proportionate sanction."