Pensioner in hospital after Sunderland seagull attack

82-year-old Amelia Wild is now frightened to go outside her Monkwearmouth home after being attacked by seagulls.
82-year-old Amelia Wild is now frightened to go outside her Monkwearmouth home after being attacked by seagulls.
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A DIVE-BOMBING seagull left a frail pensioner in hospital after repeatedly targeting her.

The bird has made life hell for Amelia Wild, swooping on her every time she steps outside her door in Monkwearmouth.

82 year old Amelia Wild is now frightened to go outside her Monkwearmouth home after being attacked by seagulls.'The young seagull beside the nest on the roof of Amelia Wild's home.

82 year old Amelia Wild is now frightened to go outside her Monkwearmouth home after being attacked by seagulls.'The young seagull beside the nest on the roof of Amelia Wild's home.

In the latest attack, the 82-year-old had to be taken to A&E at Sunderland Royal Hospital after the seagull dive-bombed, causing her to fall backwards and split her head.

Doctors put stitches in the wound, but the pensioner, who also suffered severe bruising, has been left shaken by the fall.

Daughter Carol Douglas, 54, said: “She’s scared to walk out the door now.

“The seagull’s got a young one on the roof, which means every time someone goes in or out of the house, the mother swoops down.”

Carol has contacted the council to see if they can help remove the bird, as she is becoming increasingly concerned about her mother’s well-being.

She said: “Dad died four years ago, and since then mam has spent a lot of time in the garden.

“She loves her garden, but now she doesn’t want to go out there.

“The nest has been there for a while, but the other day my sister Joan had gone to mum’s house, and they were just leaving when the bird swooped again.

“Mum lost her balance and fell backwards against the brickwork and the door frame, splitting her head open.”

Joan, 52, ran outside to help Amelia back to her feet before calling Carol, who lives nearby, close to Dame Dorothy School.

Carol added: “We took her up to A&E, and she needed two stitches to her head.”

Carol believes efforts should be made to remove the aggressive bird so her mum doesn’t have to live in fear.

Councillor James Blackburn, cabinet member for city services at Sunderland City Council, said: “The council has an annual proactive programme of bird control measures aimed at controlling the number of gulls in the city. All work is carried out within the restrictions set out in the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, which protects all birds, but significantly, in this particular case, herring gulls due to their protected status.

“Parent birds often swoop during the breeding season, especially when the young birds leave the nest and are unable to fly.”

l Anyone having problems with this type of seagull behaviour can call 520 5550 for advice.