Thumbs up for caring primary school

TV Personality and Alzheimers Society Ambassador Angela Rippon talking to local residents and pupils at Bernard Gilpin Primary School on Wednesday, Shee was visiting the school toi see foir herself the wiork the school is doing to heklp those affected by Alzheimers
TV Personality and Alzheimers Society Ambassador Angela Rippon talking to local residents and pupils at Bernard Gilpin Primary School on Wednesday, Shee was visiting the school toi see foir herself the wiork the school is doing to heklp those affected by Alzheimers
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A Wearside school which recently picked up a national award, has another cause for celebration.

In September, Bernard Gilpin Primary School in Houghton, was presented with the Best Dementia Friendly Educational Initiative Award by TV personality Angela Rippon at the Alzheimer’s Society’s Dementia Friendly Awards 2015 in London.

The award was for the school’s contribution towards the fight against dementia.

Now, the children and staff have been praised by Ofsted bosses following a recent short inspection, and were dubbed as good.

In a letter to headteacher, Andrew Bainbridge, inspectors said: “The school continues to improve. You and your staff have created a calm and purposeful atmosphere in the school.

“Together you have built on positive relationships between staff and pupils that are characterised by mutual respect.

“Teachers work hard to provide an innovative, stimulating and action-packed curriculum with a strong focus on real-life experience, including a host of educational visits for every pupil. As a consequence, pupils are proud of their school, concentrate well in lessons and are enthusiastic about their learning.”

They said the children behave well, play well together and bullying is rare.

The inspectors said: “Parents have a positive view of the school and have high regard for the education their child receives.

“Pupils, whatever their starting points, make at least expected progress and many make better than expected progress. Those who need to catch up do so quickly.

“Pupils make good and better progress across most classes. In Key Stage 2, every child made the progress expected of them. Progress in Key Stage 1 is steady, with some pupils making good progress and catching up quickly where they need to.

“The progress of disadvantaged pupils matches and sometimes exceeds that seen elsewhere.”

Inspectors said teachers work hard to bring learning to life, the improving standard of writing is evident in pupils’ work and the presentation and handwriting seen in books is exceptional.

They added: “Governors know the school well and have an accurate view of the overall effectiveness of the provision. They know the priorities for further improvement and hold you and your senior leaders to account. Their actions and decisions help influence school improvement priorities.”