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These students want your underwear – find out how it would help

Sunderland University students Scott Row and Emma Woodhall, who are raising money to go and work next year in Tanzania, helping impoverished communities and local schools and hospitals. The pair are collecting bras as part of a social enterprise project called BRAID to help establish wage earning projects in Tanzania.

Sunderland University students Scott Row and Emma Woodhall, who are raising money to go and work next year in Tanzania, helping impoverished communities and local schools and hospitals. The pair are collecting bras as part of a social enterprise project called BRAID to help establish wage earning projects in Tanzania.

TWO students are on a mission to help communities by collecting unwanted underwear.

Scott Rowan and Emma Woodhall, from Sunderland University, who have been chosen to take part in an aid expedition to Tanzania, are already helping impoverished communities there by supporting Braid.

Braid is a project which allows people to sell unwanted bras in Tanzania, as small social enterprise schemes.

Scott and Emma will be spending their Easter break next year helping out in the village of Moshi, but first they need to raise £1,100 each in order to make the trip in support of aid project Lost in Africa.

Scott, from Sunderland, who is studying healthcare science, will be helping with HIV awareness programmes at local hospitals.

Emma, who studies English language and linguistics combined with French, will be assisting teachers in local schools, developing their education techniques.

Already the pair have been raising money through various activities and have each received a £500 award from the university’s Futures Fund programme.

Emma, 26, a mum-of-two from Ferryhill, said: “When I found out about this Tanzania trip through the student magazine Fuse, it was an opportunity I could not let go. It’s only a 10-day trip, but fits in with my family life.

“I’ll be part of a team of 12 people going which includes students, teachers, doctors and midwives.

“I can’t wait to help out in the village schools in Tanzania with teaching methods and setting up a rotation system.

“They currently have one teacher per 90 students and we wish to get that number down to about 30 students, encouraging them to use the system we have in Britain of one hour per lesson, break time, another lesson, lunch etc.

“Also, the teachers do not earn a wage so we will help them set up a profitable business and generate a wage for themselves.”

Scott, 26, said: “As part of a small team I’ll be working in a hospital during the trip, understanding the culture and medical practices, offering medical advice based on observations seen in the hospital.

“We’re both delighted that the university has given our fundraising efforts such a huge boost through the University’s Futures Fund.”

To donate unwanted bras visit www.lostevents.co.uk.

Twitter: @sunechoschools

 

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